Blog

NOTE: I WILL UPLOAD THE TEXTBOOK AND BELOW IS THE LECTURE LINK: ( in messages) I

NOTE: I WILL UPLOAD THE TEXTBOOK AND BELOW IS THE LECTURE LINK: ( in messages)
In an essay of at least three full double-spaced, typewritten pages, with normal margins and no more than 12-point font:
1. Succinctly summarize the central themes of the course materials (not just the textbook! MUST USE TEXTBOOK AND LECTURE) on your chosen topic. This part of the essay tests your ability to organize and condense information on your own. This can be difficult to do well but it is an important skill!
2. Discuss at least two things – ideas, findings, information – you learned about this topic that you didn’t know. These must be drawn from the course materials – readings, textbook, or lecture. They may be things that you think are important, or which surprised you, or which challenged things you thought you knew, or even things you find hard to accept. This part of the essay asks you to think about what you actually learned relative to what you knew before taking the course, and identify something noteworthy that you took from this section of the course.
3. Finally, with respect to the ideas or information you identify in step 2, tell me in some detail about your response to this new information. If it changed or challenged your thinking on this subject, how so? Or if it didn’t, why not? In this part of the essay, I am looking for thoughtful, honest, and serious reflection on what you learned. You won’t be graded on your opinion of what was taught, but rather on the thoughtfulness and seriousness of your reflection. In other words, “This whole topic was dumb” and “I loved learning about this” would get equally poor grades – but a serious reflection will earn full points.
Notes:
1- No formal bibliography is required since the assignment only involves your reaction to course materials.
2- If quoting text from articles or textbook, make it clear in your text which source you are quoting, use quotation marks, and cite page numbers (if applicable).
3-If you are summarizing ideas and information from source, you need to do so in your own words. You can’t simply cut and paste sections of text from the sources and present these as your own work.

Look again at the paragraph you wrote in Module Five; if you check “Grades,” you

Look again at the paragraph you wrote in Module Five; if you check “Grades,” you should find that assignment with my annotations and comments.
Notice the structure of that paragraph. Particularly, think about each sentence of evidence as the topic sentence of an essay’s body paragraph.
Write a body paragraph of no fewer than three hundred (300) and no more than four hundred (400) words for each of those topic sentence. In other words, use each evidence sentence of Module Five’s paragraph to form a new and separate paragraph. If your paragraph’s outline followed the Rule of Three, you should have three paragraphs; if last week’s paragraph included more than three sentences of evidence, then you will write more than three paragraphs.
Remember that each paragraph should follow the TETS pattern.
Remember that each paragraph should include at least two (2) sentences of explanation for each point of evidence.
I agree that this seems like a great deal of writing, but when you’ve completed this assignment you will have completed a first version of the body of your final essay. Having this version to look at can save you time and effort as you work on that project next week.

Part One: Presentation Content Expectations: Create a professional presentation

Part One: Presentation Content Expectations: Create a professional presentation to be shared using any of the digital presentation tools listed in Week 1. You will talk through your presentation, creating a video and/or audio recording with the link provided in part two of the assignment. More specific instructions can be located in the Week 6 Instructor Guidance. In your presentation, describe what will be included at the following stations at the Community Event;
Station 1: Universal Design for Learning (UDL): Three to four slides. Information shared on the slide(s) and viewed by the audience should be succinct and void of excessive detail. Specific details and descriptions should be included in part two; the written synopsis.
Audience (0.5 point): Discuss how you will get the audiences’ attention to visit this station. What might the station look like or include to draw people to it?
Information (1 points): Describe the most essential information attendees should know about UDL and how it specifically pertains to the population of Pre-Kindergarten through 12th grade students in the school district or the adult learners at the community center. Include references for at least two sources to support this information.
Demonstrate (1 point): Discuss how would you demonstrate UDL in action. For example, would you include a video of it being modeled, a sample instructional plan, or an example of a resource or source of technology that supports UDL such as what was reviewed during Week 4?
Differentiation (2 points): Discuss the impact UDL has on teaching and learning for the specific population of PK through 12th grade students at the school district or adult learners at the community center. In your discussion, include how incorporating UDL principles enhances learning by providing differentiated learning opportunities. Also include a reference for at least one source to support this information.
Interaction (1 point): Describe how attendees could interact in this station. How might this increase their interest and appreciation for educational use of technology?
Station 2: Technology and UDL for All Learners: Two to three slides. Utilize information gleaned from your state’s Department of Education website, your local school district’s website, and/or the Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) Links to an external site.website to support your ideas for this station. Information shared on the slide(s) and viewed by the audience should be succinct and void of excessive detail. Specific details and descriptions should be included in part two; the written synopsis.
Mission, Belief, and Goals (3 points): Craft an original mission and belief statement for your school district or community center as it pertains to technology integration and career and technical education (CTE). Construct two to three specific goals for the educational programs or courses offered to the respective population served that align with the mission and beliefs.
Course and/or Program Offerings (1 point): Construct a list of eight to ten courses or programs including CTE courses offered in either the school district or the community center to serve as examples to attendees of this station. The school district’s courses should include courses or programs that impact all three levels of learners and school environments including elementary, middle/junior high school, and high school students.
Station 3: 21st Century Skills Acquisition and Employability: Two to three slides. Information shared on the slides and viewed by the audience should be succinct and void of excessive detail. Specific details and descriptions should be included in part two; the written synopsis.
Technology and 21st-Century Skills (5 points):
Showcase one specific course from the courses offered list that integrates technology. Be sure to list the course on your slide.
Describe at least one 21st-century skill from each of the four 21st-century outcomes (Key Subjects and 21st Century Themes, Learning and Innovation Skills, Information, Media and Technology Skills, Life and Career Skills) represented in the Partnership for 21st-Century Skills Definitions Links to an external site.framework that students should gain as a result of participating in the course.
Go to the Information, Media, and Technology Skills Outcome heading, then under Media Literacy, locate Applying Technology Effectively. Describe how your selected course addresses one, two or all three bullets under the Applying Technology Effectively heading. How will these skills support future employability for students?
Tools (1 point): Include an additional example of a tech/digital tool used in one or more courses. Be sure to list the course and how that tool is used in the course.
Interaction (1 point): Describe how attendees might interact with the information and tool(s) presented at this station. How might this increase their interest and appreciation for educational use of technology?
New Technology (1 points): Discuss how school or community programs, courses, and students would benefit from upgraded technology from approved bond.
Slide Design and Format (2 points): Total of 8 to 10 slides including the title and references slides. Use relevant graphics to enhance the presentation without distracting from the main focus. Slides should have a consistent theme, format, and font that augment the readability of the presentation. Rather than using the speaker’s notes on each slide, details that would be shared with the audience will be provided in the second part of the assignment; the written synopsis. Save the presentation as a pdf., pwpt., or pwptx. file that shows speaker’s notes for viewing in Waypoint and Turnitin.
Title & References Slides (1 point): The Title slide should include your name, course name and number (EDU620), instructor’s name, the date, a title for your event and the role you have selected to take for the project (district educator or community center representative).
Part Two: Written Synopsis
Follow the same outline for all three stations of your event featured in the Part One: Presentation. Here, you will provide the details for each part that would help inform the audience during your presentation. The details are what cannot be included on the slides. This three to five page document will include the link to your presentation and be submitted to Waypoint for evaluation. Your instructor will use your recorded presentation and the written synopsis to evaluate your work.
Link to presentation (0.5 points)
Follows presentation guidelines (2 points)

Content Instructions Lesson Overview (1 point): Include the title, author, subje

Content Instructions
Lesson Overview (1 point): Include the title, author, subject, grade level(s), and duration of the lesson. (Lesson should be 30 to 90 minutes long, depending on your population.)
Lesson Description for the Day (0.5 point): Include a brief description of the essential learning to be experienced by students and practiced during the lesson. Include the approximate duration of the lesson (30 to 90 minutes total).
State Standard/s (1 point): Include the state grade-level standard this lesson aligns with. Include the whole standard rather than just its label (see Instructor Guidance for an example). You may use a standard from the Common Core State Standards or your own state standards.
Lesson Goals (1 point): Also known as the lesson objectives. Construct one to two content-specific objectives for lesson. The objectives should be written in student terms and contain a single, observable, and measurable verb indicating the skill in students will be assessed for during instruction.
Teaching Methods:
Describe the anticipatory set (1 point)
Address how you will introduce and model new knowledge (1 point)
Describe the guided practice (1 point)
Describe the independent practice (1 point)
Wrap-Up (Closing) (1 point): Explain how you will close the lesson and in what manner students will debrief from the learning experience.
Assessment (1.5 points): Describe what you will assess during the lesson (formative assessment) as described in either or both the guided practice and/or independent practice stages of the lesson.
Save your instructional plan as a doc. file and upload it along with Part II to the classroom for evaluation.
Written Communication Instructions
Syntax and Mechanics (1 point): Display meticulous comprehension and organization of syntax and mechanics, such as spelling and grammar.
Part Two – Analysis/Summary Content Instructions
Reflection (3 points): In a separate two-to-three page Word document, include a reflection in which you address the following questions:
How does your lesson serve as motivation for learners? ? Provide specific examples and clearly explain how those examples motivate your learners. Be sure to use evidence from the readings and/or outside sources to support this point.
How does your lesson stimulate critical thinking in your students? Provide specific examples and clearly explain how those examples stimulate critical thinking. Be sure to use evidence from the readings and/or outside sources to support this point.
How does the lesson model a non-threatening environment providing differentiated learning opportunities without isolating students? Provide specific examples and be sure to clearly explain how the lesson models a non-threatening environment providing differentiated learning opportunities without isolating students.

You Be The Judge #6: TYPES OF WARRANTIES INTRODUCTION: Read the overview below a

You Be The Judge #6: TYPES OF WARRANTIES
INTRODUCTION:
Read the overview below and complete the activities that follow.
The following “You be the Judge” video involves a scenario where the judge must determine whether there are any express or implied warranties for products sold by the defendant. The defendant sold guitars to the plaintiff’s company, and the plaintiff argues that the guitars did not meet the specifications they agreed upon.
CONCEPT REVIEW:
At common law, the only implied warranty is the warranty of assignability. When a party “assigns” a contract to another party, the assignor is impliedly guaranteeing that the rights being assigned are valid. However, the Uniform Commercial Code adds to this concept. The warranties discussed in this chapter include both express and implied warranties. Express warranties are explicitly stated, whereas implied warranties are automatically, as a matter of law, injected into the contract.
Plaintiff:
https://www.viddler.com/embed/41add99f/?f=1&autoplay=0&player=full&disablebranding=0
Defendant:
https://www.viddler.com/embed/a370b441/?f=1&autoplay=0&player=full&disablebranding=0
Arguments:
https://www.viddler.com/embed/aebc1ee5/?f=1&autoplay=0&player=full&disablebranding=0
Plaintiff Reaction:
https://www.viddler.com/embed/fce46ff/?f=1&autoplay=0&player=full&disablebranding=0
Defendant Reaction:
https://www.viddler.com/embed/361d55fa/?f=1&autoplay=0&player=full&disablebranding=0
What is the judge’s ruling? In your answer, discuss any and all express and implied warranties.. As part of your answer, please define express warranty, implied warranty, disclaimer, and any relevant implied warranties. With reference to Exhibit 1-1, which Purpose of the Law is fulfilled by the Implied Warranties of Quality that arise under the UCC? Why?

Methods of Discharging a Contract Introduction: Students learn about the differe

Methods of Discharging a Contract
Introduction:
Students learn about the different ways contractual obligations can be terminated and discharged, including performance, the happening of a condition or its failure to occur, material breach by one or both parties, agreement of the parties, and operation of law.
Concept Review:
Once a party has entered into a binding agreement, how does the party terminate their obligations under the contract? When a party’s obligations under a contract are terminated, the party is said to be discharged. There are a number of ways by which a party’s contractual obligations can be terminated and the party thereby discharged.
The Baltimore Business Journal and other news headlines in the past year identified many times that two parties to a contract discharged the contract. Please post a screen shot of a recent headline showing two or more businesses that have contractually parted ways. Please explain the headline. Identify the parties to the contract, how the contract was discharged, and what you think may have been the business reason for the discharge. As part of your answer, please define the particular method of discharging a contract described in your article. Do you feel the discharge was a smart business decision? Why? Please remember to provide a citation to the news headline.

Uniform Commercial Code Introduction: Read the overview below and complete the a

Uniform Commercial Code
Introduction:
Read the overview below and complete the activities that follow.
Before beginning this activity, read LO 15-1, 15-2, and 15-3 in your text. Be sure to pay close attention to the types of sale and lease contracts that fall under the Uniform Commercial Code. It is important to emphasize that the UCC does not pertain to all business transactions.
Concept Review:
It is important for businesses and organizations that purchase products to be aware of which laws govern their purchases. Furthermore, it is important to understand which laws govern these purchases primarily because the laws can differ, especially with sales contracts. Specifically, three sources of laws that interpret sales contracts exist: state common law, the Uniform Commercial Code, and state statutory law. The Uniform Commercial Code is a uniform, or model, law that states have adopted to govern contracts.
Three Cases:
1. A rapper wishes to purchase the rights of a copyrighted song from another musician in the sale of the copyrighted material.
2. Bob the farmer enters into a sale contract to sell his annual corn crop to a local grain distributor. Bob sells the corn when the grain is still growing in his field.
3. For her eighteenth birthday, Joanna receives a set of diamond stud earrings as a gift from her boyfriend, Adam, and his family.
Read the above three cases. Which, if any, of the above contracts are governed by the common law, and which, if any, of the above contracts are governed by the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC)? Why? As part of your answer, please define the UCC and the common law. Finally, please answer the following question: Why does a business law student need to know about the UCC?

Third Party Beneficiaries Introduction: Contracts may be written to benefit a th

Third Party Beneficiaries
Introduction:
Contracts may be written to benefit a third party. The law recognizes that third parties who are intended beneficiaries have the right to enforce the contracts.

Concept Review:
An intended beneficiary is a third party to a contract whom the contracting parties intended to benefit directly from their contract.
Case:
Please read CASE 13-3: Lawrence v. Fox, 20 N.Y. 268 (1859).
Critical Thinking Question: Form an opinion about the contemporary relevance of this ruling. Given the widespread and extremely significant changes in U.S. society and the world over the past 150 years, what is the justification for consideration of such an old case? How does this type of process aid our legal system? How might it detract from the reasonableness of modern deliberations? Please remember to define promisor, promisee, and intended beneficiary in your discussion.

CASE STUDIES – please follow the Rubric Guidelines There are two parts to each c

CASE STUDIES – please follow the Rubric Guidelines
There are two parts to each case study. First, PART 1 IS attached as “Case study 1”, “case study 2”, “case study 3. ” Second, write a report following the guidelines described in each case study assignment.
I purposefully do not provide an example because I want to see creativity and professionalism in these written reports. Each assignment has a specific audience and the report should be written to that audience in a way they will understand. When we grade, we read it from that perspective.
Written report:
Explanation: 30%
Professionalism: 30%
Spelling and Grammar: 20%
1 page per case study

Grading: 30 points Follows General Guidelines (5 points) 3-5 pages (not includi

Grading: 30 points
Follows General Guidelines (5 points)
3-5 pages (not including title page or reference page)
Includes separate title page with the topic choice
Includes separate reference page
Application (17 points)
Follows the outline formatted below/ answers the questions fully
Apply information from the textbook, references, and class to address the topic (should have in-text citations)
3. Quality of Written Report (8 points)
Double spaced, 12-point font, 1” margins, black ink
College level writing style and composition (proofread, caps, and punctuation correct)
Paper Outline:
SUBJECT INTRODUCTION
What subject did you choose to focus on?
Describe why you chose this particular subject, e.g., to increase your knowledge; to clarify conflicting views on the subject; to learn practical suggestions or tools for your personal life; etc.
What questions did you have before you began your research on the subject?
CURRENT RESEARCH
Using your text and other sources, explore the current views on this subject, or compare and contrast the opposing viewpoints on the topic, or describe the practical tools or “learnings” helpful to you personally.
What are the conclusions you have drawn from your review?
Include citations for all information and concepts that are not your own, and include a reference page at the end of your paper.
SUMMARY
Having completed your review, have your views changed, or have they remained the same?
Discuss whether you understand this subject better and why.
Final summary of the paper overall.
REFERENCE PAGE (NOT counted as one of the required pages.)
Use APA style
Should be a minimum of 3 sources (your textbook can count as 1