Task: What issue, problem or need would you like to address in this assignment?

Task: What issue, problem or need would you like to address in this assignment?
To whom would you write with a request for funding, contributions, time, or support? What research or evidence would you need to discuss to show feasibility? Write a proposal to the appropriate audience or stakeholders. Delineate the context, idea, objectives, resources, timeline, budget, and significance. (2000 words)
Purpose: A proposal is a plan of action written with the aim of receiving approval, funding, mentorship or other support. An effective proposal shows that you have done some ‘preliminary’ research about the context; it demonstrates that you have solid, specific knowledge about the issue, problem or need. An effective proposal must present a persuasive argument for how your plan will offer a solution or new contribution. Proposals are most often judged according to the criteria of feasibility, scope, merit and significance.
Content Elements to Include in your Proposal:
o Introduction
o Context & Background
o Problem / Situation
o Proposed Solution / Contribution
o Methods / Methodology
o Resources Needed
o Budget
o Timeline
o Benefits (to Audience / Organisation / Funders) o Significance
References: (not included in word count): List sources consulted, such as model proposals. Also list references for any research conducted or outside sources cited in the proposal itself.

READ ALL INSTRUCTIONS, AND USED THE INFORMATION PROVIDED -single parent mom -in

READ ALL INSTRUCTIONS, AND USED THE INFORMATION PROVIDED
-single parent mom
-in the military, trying to commission to an officer in the future
-first generation to obtain bachelor degree
-working as well
For the purposes of this assignment, your goals in the domains of education, career, and life are the project you are managing.
For each domain, you will write down three to five goals you would like to accomplish.
Take some time to reflect on which goals are most important to you and why.
Circle the most important goal in each area.
Once you have chosen a most important goal for each area, list them on the table in the instructional worksheet.
For each goal, write down barriers, things you need to reach the goal, and implementation benchmarks for each goal.
The next step is to sequence events in order to reach your goal.
At the bottom of the PERT Chart, list at least three goals for each domain.
On the PERT chart, you will fill in the timeline using numbered nodes (or text boxes), to represent the milestones above. Vectors, or directional lines, will indicate sequential tasks (also referred to as dependent or serial tasks). Concurrent (or parallel) tasks are indicated using diverging arrow directions. These tasks are not dependent on the outcome of a previous task and may be undertaken simultaneously.

3 pages and 1 chart, PLEASE SEE ATTACHMENT Use the following details: -single p

3 pages and 1 chart, PLEASE SEE ATTACHMENT
Use the following details:
-single parent mom
-in the military, trying to commission to an officer in the future
-first generation to obtain bachelor degree
-working as well
Discuss your future goals.
Identify and prioritize your career, educational, and life goals in relation to where you are at this time.
Why are these goals important?
What challenges might you face in meeting these goals?
How might you overcome those challenges?
Integrate course concepts and reflections into your personal and professional growth plan.
Goal is 3 pages.

overview to contextualize argument to come.

PROMPT
An outline will help you map out your Researched Argument before you begin writing it so you won’t get lost during the drafting process. Below, I include a skeletal structure that you might want to follow for your own outline. Note that each subsection may in reality be more than one paragraph, depending on the subclaim. You may find you need more or fewer subsections, depending on what supporting points you need to establish in order to prove your thesis.
PREPARATION
Look back at the conclusion of your Literature Review. What existing gaps in the literature where more research needs to be done, areas where a different argument needs to be made, or parts of the story that need to be reconsidered did you identify? This is where you might be able to make a unique contribution to the conversation. Your thesis for the Researched Argument will likely fill one of these gaps, make one of these needed arguments, or reconsider one of these parts of the story.
Week 10’s lesson, Thesis Statements: Roadmapping the Researched Argument, will help you refine your thesis statement from there. After you refine your thesis, write an outline that will help you prove your thesis step by step. To write an effective outline for your Researched Argument, you should have a good grasp on the importance of subclaims to an argument. See Week 11’s lesson, How to Organize an Argument: Making Claims and Subclaims for resources and a breakdown of these concepts.
CONTENT & STRUCTURE
(You may find you need to establish more subclaims to effectively support your thesis. 3 is the bare minimum.)
Introduction
Topic overview to contextualize argument to come.
Situates your argument to come by identifying the general themes and arguments in the conversation. You might not talk about every camp, or every theme. Instead, you’ll focus on those that are the closest to your argument. These may be the camps, themes, or arguments that you are building on, either by agreeing or disagreeing with the positions.
Identifies major voices in the conversation that have influenced or refined your thinking and provides definitions for key terms.
States your unique, tension-filled thesis (main claim).
Section heading 1 (subclaim 1)
Grounds 1 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Grounds 2 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Grounds 3 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Implications of subclaim 1 on conversation
Transition
Section heading 2 (subclaim 2)
Grounds 1 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Grounds 2 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Grounds 3 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Implications of subclaim 2 on conversation
Transition
Section heading 3 (subclaim 3)
Grounds 1 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Grounds 2 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Grounds 3 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Implications of subclaim 3 on conversation
Transition
Section heading 4 (back to the main claim; synthesizing previous subclaims and evidence to tie-in to main claim)
Grounds 1 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Grounds 2 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Grounds 3 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Implications on conversation
Transition
Conclusion
Draws conclusions about topic described in introduction.
Predicts impact and implications of your research and discusses further applications of your paper.
Discusses what still needs to be learned, discussed, or researched.
Briefly summarizes how your research and work has altered or refined your thinking on the topic, including interesting discoveries or insights along the way.
Suggests new directions for the research to move in.
FORMAT & GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
.doc or .docx
academic heading and title
Times New Roman font and 1″ margins
All source material cited consistently (may be MLA, APA, Chicago, etc.—as long as it is consistent to a single style guide) with a works cited page at the end

For this journal entry, you will read and reflect upon “The New Jim Crow” by Mic

For this journal entry, you will read and reflect upon “The New Jim Crow” by Michelle Alexander in They Say, I Say (Ch. 20). In order to successfully complete this journal entry, you will need to identify the conversation Alexander is participating in about race, criminal justice, and mass incarceration. You should use the templates we have learned about so far in order to help you write a reflective journal entry of 300-500 words based on the questions and assignment criteria below. One way to approach this assignment would be to use and adapt the “Template of Templates” in the Introduction to your textbook.
For your consideration:
What conversation is Alexander participating in? Who is her “They Say” and what does she think about their point(s) of view?
What is the general claim made by Alexander in this essay?
What is the most important critique she offers in her essay?
What do you think about her claims and evidence?

The Researched Argument is Stage 3 of your semester long research project, a for

The Researched Argument is Stage 3 of your semester long research project, a formal academic argument in essay form. It should contribute something original to the conversation on your chosen topic and should demonstrate how your thinking on the topic has evolved or become more nuanced through sustained research. All of the claims you make must be grounded in good evidence, some of which will come from the sources that you have been working with all semester. Although you will be working with many of the same sources, unlike your Literature Review, your Researched Argument must be an entirely thesis-driven essay. This means that every paragraph in the body of your essay must be connected to your larger argument in support of your thesis.
Remember that your goal can be to add something valuable to a larger conversation on a topic. While identifying a specific overlooked facet of the topic was an important step in Stage 1, you may find that some questions cannot yet be answered definitively and some stories contain multiple equally plausible versions of events. You will find as you read and research that people at the top of their field have been talking and writing about your topic, so you don’t have to discover a universal key that they haven’t. But you may have discovered a new way to think about one part of a problem related to your topic, or a nuance that helps your reconsider an accepted version of the story, and that is worth writing about.
Because you are joining a larger conversation with this paper, your primary audience is made up of those also interested in the same topic or body of research: the authors you have cited and your instructor. You’ll first review and recap the conversation for this audience in order to situate your own paper in the conversation, showing how your paper contributes to the conversation.
PREPARATION
Stage 3, the Researched Argument assignment cluster, includes 3 due dates. Each of these due dates will allow me to offer you help and advice while you conceptualize your project and produce a draft. Stage 3 in its entirety is worth 25 points of your final grade, divided as follows:
Refined Thesis & Outline due November 5 at 11:59PM (5 points)
Researched Argument Rough Draft & Peer Review due November 11 at 11:59PM (5 points)
Researched Argument Final Draft due November 19 at 11:59PM (15 points)
CONTENT & STRUCTURE
Introduction
Topic overview to contextualize argument to come.
Situates your argument to come by identifying the general themes and arguments in the conversation. You might not talk about every camp, or every theme. Instead, you’ll focus on those that are the closest to your argument. These may be the camps, themes, or arguments that you are building on, either by agreeing or disagreeing with the positions.
Identifies major voices in the conversation that have influenced or refined your thinking and provides definitions for key terms.
States your unique, tension-filled thesis.
Body
Your argument (contribution), organized logically so that, using the same evidence, the audience will follow you to your conclusion. To construct a researched argument, you need:
Multiple titled sections in the body that will explicitly structure the progression of ideas and evidence for the reader.
Paragraphs structured around topics that move the reader smoothly through each sub-section of the paper; logical connection between all ideas.
Claims supported by grounds that are logically connected through warrants and work to advance your thesis.
You MUST cite at least 6 sources over the course of you argument, ideally using a combination of quotation, summary, and paraphrase in your references to your research.
You MUST use standard in-text citations to identify the sources you are using. Remember to use a signal phrase (Links to an external site.) that introduces the author and title of a source before you quote or cite them. You must provide textual evidence to support your claims. See OWL Purdue for help with MLA and APA formatting.
Somewhere acknowledges, analyzes, and effectively rebuts at least one counterargument
Conclusion
Draws conclusions about topic described in introduction.
Predicts impact and implications of your research and discusses further applications of your paper.
Discusses what still needs to be learned, discussed, or researched.
Briefly summarizes how your research and work has altered or refined your thinking on the topic, including interesting discoveries or insights along the way.
Suggests new directions for the research to move in.
Works Cited
FORMAT & GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
.doc or .docx
academic heading and title
6-8 double-spaced pages with 1” margins
Times New Roman font
All source material cited consistently (may be MLA, APA, Chicago, etc.—as long as it is consistent to a single style guide) with a works cited page at the end

PROMPT An outline will help you map out your Researched Argument before you begi

PROMPT
An outline will help you map out your Researched Argument before you begin writing it so you won’t get lost during the drafting process. Below, I include a skeletal structure that you might want to follow for your own outline. Note that each subsection may in reality be more than one paragraph, depending on the subclaim. You may find you need more or fewer subsections, depending on what supporting points you need to establish in order to prove your thesis.
PREPARATION
Look back at the conclusion of your Literature Review. What existing gaps in the literature where more research needs to be done, areas where a different argument needs to be made, or parts of the story that need to be reconsidered did you identify? This is where you might be able to make a unique contribution to the conversation. Your thesis for the Researched Argument will likely fill one of these gaps, make one of these needed arguments, or reconsider one of these parts of the story.
Week 10’s lesson, Thesis Statements: Roadmapping the Researched Argument, will help you refine your thesis statement from there. After you refine your thesis, write an outline that will help you prove your thesis step by step. To write an effective outline for your Researched Argument, you should have a good grasp on the importance of subclaims to an argument. See Week 11’s lesson, How to Organize an Argument: Making Claims and Subclaims for resources and a breakdown of these concepts.
CONTENT & STRUCTURE
(You may find you need to establish more subclaims to effectively support your thesis. 3 is the bare minimum.)
Introduction
Topic overview to contextualize argument to come.
Situates your argument to come by identifying the general themes and arguments in the conversation. You might not talk about every camp, or every theme. Instead, you’ll focus on those that are the closest to your argument. These may be the camps, themes, or arguments that you are building on, either by agreeing or disagreeing with the positions.
Identifies major voices in the conversation that have influenced or refined your thinking and provides definitions for key terms.
States your unique, tension-filled thesis (main claim).
Section heading 1 (subclaim 1)
Grounds 1 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Grounds 2 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Grounds 3 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Implications of subclaim 1 on conversation
Transition
Section heading 2 (subclaim 2)
Grounds 1 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Grounds 2 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Grounds 3 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Implications of subclaim 2 on conversation
Transition
Section heading 3 (subclaim 3)
Grounds 1 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Grounds 2 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Grounds 3 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Implications of subclaim 3 on conversation
Transition
Section heading 4 (back to the main claim; synthesizing previous subclaims and evidence to tie-in to main claim)
Grounds 1 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Grounds 2 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Grounds 3 (with citation if applicable)
Warrants
Implications on conversation
Transition
Conclusion
Draws conclusions about topic described in introduction.
Predicts impact and implications of your research and discusses further applications of your paper.
Discusses what still needs to be learned, discussed, or researched.
Briefly summarizes how your research and work has altered or refined your thinking on the topic, including interesting discoveries or insights along the way.
Suggests new directions for the research to move in.
FORMAT & GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
.doc or .docx
academic heading and title
Times New Roman font and 1″ margins
All source material cited consistently (may be MLA, APA, Chicago, etc.—as long as it is consistent to a single style guide) with a works cited page at the end

When selecting your sources, use the BEAM method to contextualize them within yo

When selecting your sources, use the BEAM method to contextualize them within your overall rhetorical purpose. You don’t want to just pick stuff at random! You should have a clear idea of what question you are trying to answer and how each source serves your purpose. No more than two of your sources should provide background information on your topic; the other four should explore the arguments within your discourse community and examine possible solutions to the problem you have identified.
Assignment Details
●    Annotated Bibliography of at least six sources = pages
●    Executive Summary = one single-spaced page
●    For each of the sources you choose, include the following in your annotated bibliography:
o    A citation, correctly formatted in APA, MLA, or another established style, depending upon the conventions and expectations of your field. (Although the genre of the bibliography is common to many disciplines, conventions for formatting and presentation vary. Part of your job is to identify and conform to the standards established for your discourse community.)
o    A one-paragraph summary of the source’s contents. This section should be summary only; do not evaluate the source. It should be objective and factual, and entirely in your own words.
o    An analysis of its rhetorical situation, including audience, purpose, and context. Basically, how do you know that this is a DC-specific text?
o    A one-paragraph reflection on how the source fits in with your research purpose and in the rhetorical context of your discourse community. What is this particular article bringing to the debate that made you want to use it? How does it connect with, add to, or complicate the other sources you’ve chosen? How is it going to be useful to you in preparing your executive summary?
●    Create a Synthesis Matrix (information on page 3) that demonstrates critical thinking of all six texts.
●    After you have completed the Bibliography and Synthesis Matrix, write a one- page (single-spaced) Executive Summary of your findings.
Other Requirements
●    Your Annotated Bibliography + Executive Summary should be formatted based on the conventions of your discourse community.
The Merriam-Webster online dictionary defines synthesis as “the composition or combination of parts or elements so as to form a whole.” In the Synthesis Matrix, you will place your six sources into conversation with your research question and with one another.

Please identify what you believe to be the 5 most important points in the book,

Please identify what you believe to be the 5 most important points in the book, The Start-Up of You.  For each point, explain why it is important and how it applies to your life.
Your essay must include an Introduction, Conclusion, excellent grammar and punctuation, and be formatted in APA style.
This paper should be written in essay form and should be 3-4 pages, double-spaced.