1)  Where do you see the themes of the Enlightenment within Paine’s writing?  Wh

1)  Where do you see the themes of the Enlightenment within Paine’s writing?  What does Paine believe makes for a just government? Where does a just government get its authority? What do the first three articles of the French Declaration have to do with this?
2) Thomas Paine is known primarily as a writer of works that helped influence the American Revolution. What does he mean when he quotes, “When I was a child, I thought as a child; but when I became a man, I put away childish things”?
3) Why does Paine claim that Moses had no authority over the other Hebrews when he came down the mountain and how does that relate to the rest of his argument?  How does that relate to the ENlightenment as a whole?
4) What taught knowledge to [hu]man[ity]?  What is [hu]man[ity]’s job?
5) E/C Age of Reason is one of my favorite texts. Did you have a favorite tenet?

Remember:    chose ONE text from ONE author from each two week period and focus

Remember:    chose ONE text from ONE author from each two week period and focus the entirety of your journal prompt on your chosen text.  These journals are personal reactions and synthesis of material; it’s too broad to include multiple different readings or authors.  Pick the one that impacted you, made you feel the most, or the one you liked best.- then explain throughout the journal entry WHY that is so because of how you answer the prompt(s).
Journals that fail to focus upon only one assigned Module’s reading will receive half credit.
Journal Prompt:
Answer all of these questions as you write your journal entries. Remember, do NOT summarize the reading; do not give a plot outline.
What is the reading about? Give the simple and most obvious answer.
What is the historical significance of this reading?  What is the societal significance of this reading?
Does the meaning of this reading change through the years from the time it was written until now? How so?
What did you understand most about this reading?  What was the easiest meaning to infer or part to understand?
What did you understand least about this reading?  What was the hardest meaning or part to understand?
What is the most important statement in the reading? Quote it if short, summarize it if long. Explain your choice of most important statement.
What word, not in the reading, would you say best explains the reading? That is to say, how would you ‘tag’ this reading in a one-word adjective. Define this word in your own words and explain your choice.
Eng 231 Journal guidelines/reminders
Good grammar, spelling, and punctuation are always appreciated when possible.
Avoid summarizing class discussions or doing Internet research. Your own thoughts are more important than researched information.  Respond, analyze, but don’t summarize.
Try to write about 3/4 of a page to a full page for each journal entry, depending on your handwriting size.
Engage with the prompt in a detailed way. For instance, give examples and specific reasons for your reaction to a reading. It is not enough to say “I liked it” or “I didn’t like it.” You must tell specifically why and give examples from the reading.
Try to give specific details or short quotes from the reading rather than making generalizations. When in doubt, write a short quote from the reading in your journal and then tell why you, for example, found it hard to understand, or why it helped you think about something in a new way.
You may consult your textbook and a dictionary when writing journal entries!

Discuss the growth of the powers of the President, specifically focusing upon ho

Discuss the growth of the powers of the President, specifically focusing upon how the powers of the president now extend beyond those that are formally granted to him (or her) in the Constitution. In your answer, be sure to illustrate it by referring to the way specific presidents have shaped and expanded the presidency. Has the president become too powerful (i.e., is there an “imperial presidency”)? Or is the president not powerful enough (i.e., is there an “imperiled presidency”)?
Required reading: Barbour—Chapter 5.1 – 5.4  (pp. 149 – 165)
McClain and Tauber–Chapter 7 (pp. 193 – 226)