Choose an aspect of Moral Conduct from Buddha’s Noble Eightfold Path to put into

Choose an aspect of Moral Conduct from Buddha’s Noble Eightfold Path to put into practice.
Explain the principle you’ve chosen and how it fits in with the goals and other principles of Buddhism.
Describe your experiences putting this principle into practice.
Critically evaluate that principle and practice. For example, did the practice provide benefits to you? How did it harmonize or conflict with other aspects of your life and with our society and culture?
In the critique, be sure to provide justifications/reasons in support of evaluative claims you make.
Summarize the experience.
Essay should be double-spaced, with 1 inch margins, and font size no larger than twelve (in a standard font like Times), minimum of 800 words.
If you quote or paraphrase a text, be sure to cite it properly. No specific citation style is necessary.
No outside sources are necessary for this essay.
Essay will be evaluated for clarity, demonstrated understanding of principles, and depth of critical reflection.

Provide a review of this attached article. 1.) Provide a summary of the case

Provide a review of this attached article.
1.) Provide a summary of the case within the article
2.) Explian who was at fault for the tire exploding? Please support your claim with evidence from the article and other references.
3.) Were there any ethical violations committed from either Ford or Firestone? Please support your claim with evidence from the article and other references.

T‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‍‍‌‍‍he discussion for this week raises a question we hear over

T‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‍‍‌‍‍he discussion for this week raises a question we hear over and over again – should the environment take precedence over the immediate economic needs of a community or the nation? With this dilemma in mind answer the following: Is mining uranium on Native lands really environmental racism? Doesn’t the mining work provide jobs and extract a product we need for our national security? How do you respond to Native Americans who have their own thoughts about environmental ethics and their own unique indigenous ecology (as covered in this week’s materials)? Do some ethical considerations override others in this case? Attached is the t‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‍‍‌‍‍extbook with readings on this topic. During the week, please read the following selections from Part IX of your textbook, Applied Ethics: A Multicultural Approach: Ramona Ilea’s “Intensive Livestock Farming: Global Trends, Increased Environmental Concerns, and Ethical Solutions” William Baxter’s “A ‘Good’ Environment: Just One of the Set of Human Objectives” Trish Glazebrook’s “Women and Climate Change: A Case Study from Northeast Ghana” Gregory Cajete’s “Look to the Mountain: Reflections on Indigenous Ecology” Shari Collins-Chobanian’s “Environmental Racism, American Indians, and Monitored Retrievabl‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‍‍‌‍‍e Storage Sites for Radioactive Waste

Identify an artifact that embodies or refers to ethical values, and write one to

Identify an artifact that embodies or refers to ethical values, and write one to two paragraphs stating what the ethical connection is. Examples of such artifacts are provided in the resources this week, but they may also be found in literature, other forms of music, live performing arts such as theater, and other visual arts.

Greetings, I want an essay detailing the commitment to change society’s view on

Greetings, I want an essay detailing the commitment to change society’s view on disabled/marginalized individuals. I have attached what I have written already, and I would like it to be expanded on. I want the essay to be about change, advocacy, and what difference looks like.

In 2007 the Star Ledger newspaper told of a young man (unnamed for his own prote

In 2007 the Star Ledger newspaper told of a young man (unnamed for his own protection) in Newark who witnessed a murder while walking home one day. It was a territorial drug dispute that didn’t even involve the murder victim who was just in the wrong place at the wrong time. The man who witnessed the murder recognized a couple of the assailants who also recognized him. He ran and wasn’t found until police discovered him during investigations.
He knew the right thing but he also knew he could put himself, his wife, and young child in danger. There are laws to protect witnesses in NJ but these laws are not always effective. Some witnesses to such murders had been murdered by gang members eager to protect themselves.
The man in the news article eventually agreed to testify when police promised to relocate him and his family to Puerto Rico.
For our discussions this week, answer the following questions and then interact with the postings of others.
1) Talk to another person you know about Kant’s moral principle of a categorical duty to never make yourself the exception to a duty you’d expect others to follow (the categorical imperative). What does this person think about it? Do either of you believe there is ever such a thing as an unquestionable moral duty and, if so, how would that apply to the murder witness in this case? If you think a witness to such a murder would be right to say nothing, explain if and when it is ever justifiable to follow a duty that could seriously cost you personally.
2) From the article “How to be True to Your Word” (LINK (Links to an external site.)), do you think the following statement about lying is true? Share your thoughts: “We may think our lying is for a good reason: to keep from insulting or wounding someone we care about, to avoid our own discomfort, to smooth over conflict or to make someone happy. Really, though, we most often lie to make our own reality more comfortable” (Cat Thompson, “How to be True to Your Word”, Experience Life, 2012). What about the so-called “white lie”? Is this kind of lie, sometimes called a pro-social lie, something morally justifiable as you see it, or not?

You are a management consultant, who has been asked by Green Company to help des

You are a management consultant, who has been asked by Green Company to help design an ethics communication and training program for all Green Company employees. Your meetings to date have been with the head of human resources, and your contract with the company has been negotiated with him. Once the papers have been signed, you begin your research and are quickly stymied by Green’s corporate counsel. He says that you will not be allowed to ask employees about ethical dilemmas that have occurred at Green. He specifically asks that you get your information from other sources, such as press accounts of problems in the industry, or from other organizations with which you have worked. In addition, the head of human resources has told you that you will be unable to meet the three most senior executives, because they are busy negotiating a large acquisition. You will have access to other high-level managers, who can tell you what they think the senior leaders want. You are instructed to write a code of conduct for the company, supported by a mission statement on ethical conduct, and prepare presentations on corporate expectations and values that will be used by the senior leadership when they meet with their employees sometime next month.
Some questions you might want to consider:
– What are the fundamental issues concerning this case?
– Why do you think the corporate counsel has put such stipulations in your way and do you think they are justified?
– Can you think of a way to complete this assignment – regardless of the stipulations?
– What would you do if you were the contractor in this scenario?
Your response should be provided in 2 – 3 pages in APA format.

A‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‍‍‌‍‍ttached is the textbook with the readings. During the week,

A‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‍‍‌‍‍ttached is the textbook with the readings. During the week, please read the following selections from Part IX of your textbook, Applied Ethics: A Multicultural Approach: Ramona Ilea’s “Intensive Livestock Farming: Global Trends, Increased Environmental Concerns, and Ethical Solutions” William Baxter’s “A ‘Good’ Environment: Just One of the Set of Human Objectives” Trish Glazebrook’s “Women and Climate Change: A Case Study from Northeast Ghana” Gregory Cajete’s “Look to the Mountain: Reflections on Indigenous Ecology” Shari Collins-Chobanian’s “Environmental Racism, American Indians, and Monitored Retrievable Storage Sites for Radioactive Waste This week our readings have focused on some environmental problems that affect our planet. Even if you do not believe in climate change, you probably acknowledge that there are serious environmental problems that need to be addressed immediately. The readings and videoclips for this week suggest that human activity has place‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‍‍‌‍‍d terrible stresses on an environment that can and may eventually betray us. Our waste poisons the water and our farming methods lay waste to rainforests and animal habitats, limiting the diversity of plants and animals that are essential to all life. Research three things you could do (beginning as soon as possible) that would have an impact (even a small impact) on the environment? Do these three things apply universally or only in developed countries? Describe whether or not you think there is something to be learned from indigenous people in this country and whether the needs of women as far off as Northeast Ghana should really be taken into consideration. Do any of those three things you could possibly do address concerns expressed by any of the thinkers this week? Your essay should be no less than three pages long, and must include three or more references. The references must be credible (no Wikipedia or random websites). Your sources must come from articles researched via the Leatherby library ‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‍‍‌‍‍website and/or academic database.

TOPIC: I would like to write about the use, development and ethical boundaries t

TOPIC: I would like to write about the use, development and ethical boundaries that we are striving for when it comes to Artificial Intelligence and its use within robotic systems. Similar to the movies “I, robot” , “Red Planet” and “Black mirror” where the artificially intelligence beings start attacking humans; what are the ethical and moral issues that should be addressed before we create such a system. For this final project I will be focusing mainly on the movie “I, robot” The ethical issues that I want to explore within the constraints of the “I, robot” movie are the following: What are the laws of robotics within the movie and how effective are they? How could we better create a robotic system that can follow a set of moral guidelines that are socially acceptable? Bibliography: Brooker, C., Reisz, B., Jones, A., Bathurst, O., Huq, K., Lyn, E., Armstrong, J., … 4 DVD (Firm),. (2012). Black mirror. “Season 4 Episode 5 titled Metal Head addresses a canine like robot that’s sole purpose is to hunt and eliminate any humans.” This will further my research by showing a negative side of what artificial intelligence could do within a robot system. This episode does not expand into the background of why the robots are homicidal but I would like to use it to touch on the potential for violence that the robotic systems could have without having any type of moral or ethical boundaries. Fridin, Marina. (2014) Kindergarten social assistive robot: First meeting and ethical issues, Computers in Human Behavior. “This scholarly article researches the interaction between a kindergarten robot designed to assist younger children with social interactions. It takes a look at both the software behind the robot and its interactions socially along with the kindergarten students and how they reacted, placed with and socialized with the robot in a school setting. This will be helpful in determining how robots can interact with humans in a school setting as well as how they interact with very young children.” Nilsson, N. J. (1982). Principles of artificial intelligence. Springer Science & Business Media. “Previous treatments of Artificial Intelligence (AI) divide the subject into its major areas of application, namely, natural language processing, automatic programming, robotics, machine vision, automatic theorem proving, intelligent data retrieval systems, etc.”. This will help my research by outlining the different areas in which AI can be divided and theorizing what could be done to better create more stable AI. This research can help with the ability to define any type of reasoning that the software of any robotic system can use to make ethical and moral decisions. Proyas, A. (2004). I, Robot. Twentieth Century Fox. “Movie staring Will Smith who portrays a futuristic detective in a world where robotic servants become self aware and believe that the human presence is a threat and must be wiped out.” This will further my research by showing a negative side of what artificial intelligence could do within a robot system. This will highlight the basis of my paper and defines the moral and ethical questions that I seek to answer in this paper. Russell, S., & Norvig, P. (2002). Artificial intelligence: a modern approach. “Humankind has given itself the scientific name homo sapiens–man the wise–because our mental capacities are so important to our everyday lives and our sense of self. The field of artificial intelligence, or AI, attempts to understand intelligent entities. Thus, one reason to study it is to learn more about ourselves. But unlike philosophy and psychology, which are also concerned with AI strives to build intelligent entities as well as understand them. Another reason to study AI is that these constructed intelligent entities are interesting and useful in their own right.” This will help my research by comparing humanity to AI and vice versa. This research will further assist in how we tend to create our AI in an image of ourselves and how that could both benefit our AI systems

What sorts of ethical questions does bio-engineering raise regarding how we use

What sorts of ethical questions does bio-engineering raise regarding how we use animals for human gain? What are at least 2 of the ethical issues raised by bio-engineering dinosaurs in Jurassic Park? Are they resolved or addressed in the film? Bio-engineering animals usually does not gain the same attention as bio-engineering humans. Why do you think this is?