Watch two films to analyze. Detour: https://ok.ru/video/1289944894192 & Scarlet

Watch two films to analyze. Detour: https://ok.ru/video/1289944894192 & Scarlet Street: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nkVGimYN9uk | Please use Part 1 of Frank Krutnik’s “In a Lonely Street” and Paul Schrader’s “Notes on Film Noir” when talking about Detour. Please use Chapter 9 from Krutnik’s “In a Lonely Street” and Chapter 5 of James Naremore’s “More than Night” when talking about Scarlet Street. They are uploaded as pdf. Paper Instructions: Use these readings to help the explain the noir style used, why it is important, and further expand on the themes presented in each film. You can consider [date of production and release (when was the film made, and why does this matter?); conditions of production, distribution, and reception (how, where, and with what purposes—beyond the profit motive—was it made?); and broader political, sociocultural, economic, and ideological factors] as well in the paper.

Please pick one of the following options to answer in 400-500 words. Option #4:

Please pick one of the following options to answer in 400-500 words.
Option #4: How does the 1942 soundtrack contribute to the meaning or experience of The Gold Rush? Be sure to use specific examples, such as particular scenes or moments. Because I have not provided access to the original silent film, do not worry about comparing the 1925 and 1942 versions. Rather, focus on how the sound functions in relation to the images in the 1942 re-release.
Things to keep in mind:
• Clearly identify which option you have chosen. (Granted, if the grader cannot instantly tell which question you are answering, your post might have some serious issues, but this step can make things easier for your TA.)
• Your post should have a clear argument. With a post of this length, you will probably want to organize your thoughts in 2-3 paragraphs.
• The anti-plagiarism software Turnitin is integrated into CCLE’s discussion forums, so be sure to cite sources. (Full bibliographic information is not necessary for course readings, so long as you include the author’s name and, if applicable, a page number.)
• 500 words is an absolute maximum, in consideration of teaching assistants’ workloads. Both you and your TA will be able to see the word count.
Students with knowledge of film form (e.g. mise en scene, cinematography, editing, sound) are encouraged to use relevant terms, but this is not required.
18 to 20 = “A” range:
Posts in this range thoroughly answer the question, provide specific examples as evidence, and convey a clear perspective. The argument put forth is original in terms of its unique understanding of course material and/or its novel use of different examples to expand upon ideas in lectures, sections, or readings. If applicable, the student properly cites readings using page numbers and outside sources. (In-text parenthetical citations are sufficient for course materials, but further bibliographic information is required for outside references.)

In the 1950s and ‘60s there were many individual filmmakers considered as film a

In the 1950s and ‘60s there were many individual filmmakers considered as film auteurs that did not fit into a “new wave,” such as Jacques Tati and Robert Bresson who stood outside of French New Wave and went their own way. In Sweden Ingmar Bergman created complex masterpieces. Spanish filmmaker Luis Bunuel excited many art cinema fans. In Italy Federico Fellini and Michelangelo Antonioni rank among the greatest talents in the film history.
Please watch one of the films directed in late ‘50s or the ‘60s by one of the above-mentioned auteurs and write a minimum 500-word essay analyzing how this film reveals major characteristics of modernist films (including but not limited to its distinct formal and aesthetic characteristics such as objective realism, subjective realism, authorial commentary, plot structure).
Suggest film list:
1.  Michelangelo Antonioni:
(1) L’ Avventure/The Adventure (1960)
(2) La Notte/The Night (1961)
(3) L’Eclisse/Eclipse (1962)
(4) Red Desert (1964)
2.  Ingmar Berman:
(1) Wild Strawberries (1957)
(2) The Seventh Seal (1957)
(3) Through a Glass Darkly (1961)
(4) Persona (1966)
(5) The Touch  (1971)
(6) Scenes from a Marriage (1973)
3. Federico Fellini:
(1) Nights of Cabiria (1957)
(2) La Dolce Vita/The Sweet Life (1960)
(3) 8½ (1963)
(4) Juliet of the Spirits (1965)
4. Luis Bunuel:
(1) Viridiana (1961)
(2) The Exterminating Angel (1962) https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2boe7u
(3) Diary of a Chambermaid (1964) https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2cad1f
(4) Belle de jour (1967)
(5) The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoise (1972)
5. Robert Bresson:
(1) A Man Escaped (1956)
(2) Pickpocket (1959)
(3) Au Hasard Balthazar/At Random Balthazar (1966)
(4) Mouchette (1967)
6. Jacques Tati:
(1) My Uncle (1958)
(2) Playtime (1967)
(3) Traffic (1971)
You should synthesize your knowledge of the history and aesthetic concepts of auteurism and the development of modernist film language through the required readings and the lecture in the class.

elect and watch at least one of the following films:  High Noon (1952), Invasion

elect and watch at least one of the following films:  High Noon (1952), Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), A Raisin in the Sun (1961). Then:
In no more than 3-5 sentences, summarize the film as if you are describing it to someone who has not seen it. What is the story that the filmmaker(s) told? Do not give a blow-by-blow report, but convey the main story, characters, and theme(s) so that your fellow students will have a general idea about the movie from reading your reflection. Avoid spoilers when possible!
In 3-5 sentences, discuss the ways the filmmaker(s) chose to tell their story with the knowledge and technology they had at their disposal. How did they innovate? What creative choices were made? I’m not interested in whether or not you thought the film was boring, or if you liked the special-effects. Instead focus on the artistic choices that the filmmaker used to tell their story (setting, style, lighting, editing, costumes, make up, etc.) How are these techniques used and how effective were they? Use specific examples to support your statements.
identify the context in which the film was made. How did the society, politics, and technology of the time influence the creative decisions that were made? How did these factors contribute (or detract) from the story the filmmakers were trying to tell? What were the filmmakers trying to say? What impact did the film have politically, culturally, or economically in their own country or abroad?

Select a movie of your choice and chart the plot utilizing the Three Act Structu

Select a movie of your choice and chart the plot utilizing the Three Act Structure.
Cite specifically Plot Point 1 and Plot Point 2. Also do a character analysis of
THREE characters utilizing their Professional, Personal, and Private
backgrounds in the movie. You need to provide the four qualities of ONE character including Dramatic Need, Point of View, Attitude, and Transformation, AND provide an analysis of ONE character utilizing the
twelve-part Hero’s journey including, The Ordinary World, Call to Adventure,
Refusal of the Call, Meeting the Mentor, Crossing the Threshold, Tests, Allies, and
Enemies, The Approach, The Ordeal, The Reward, The Road Back, The
Resurrection, and The Return. Word Process on a separate sheet of paper a short
description of the movie and why you chose it.

New Waves or New Cinemas from the Greater China Region and write a short essay discussing its uniqueness and similarity with other new waves/new cinemas after the 1960s in the world, as well as what makes it “new” in terms of film aesthetics:

Please choose one of the following New Waves or New Cinemas from the Greater China Region and write a short essay discussing its uniqueness and similarity with other new waves/new cinemas after the 1960s in the world, as well as what makes it “new” in terms of film aesthetics:
1. Hong Kong New Wave
(1) Father and Son (Allen Fong, 1981)
(2) Boat People (Ann Hui, 1982)
2. Taiwan New Cinema
(1) The Boys from Fengkuei (1983)
(2) Taipei Story (1985)
3. The Fifth Generation of China
(1) Yellow Earth (Chen Kaige, 1984)
(2) The Black Cannon Incident (Huang Jianxin, 1985)
(3) The Horse Thieves (Tian Zhunagzhuang, 1986)
(4) Red Sorghum (Zhang Yimou, 1987)
Word limit: minimum 500 English words (Chinese 800 words).
You need to make your argument based on the required readings, class lecture, and your own thoughts. You need to cite your sources when using other people’s writings. Remember to include a cover page with all the vital information.

Please choose one of the following New Waves or New Cinemas from the Greater Chi

Please choose one of the following New Waves or New Cinemas from the Greater China Region and write a short essay discussing its uniqueness and similarity with other new waves/new cinemas after the 1960s in the world, as well as what makes it “new” in terms of film aesthetics:
1. Hong Kong New Wave
(1) Father and Son (Allen Fong, 1981)
(2) Boat People (Ann Hui, 1982)
2. Taiwan New Cinema
(1) The Boys from Fengkuei (1983)
(2) Taipei Story (1985)
3. The Fifth Generation of China
(1) Yellow Earth (Chen Kaige, 1984)
(2) The Black Cannon Incident (Huang Jianxin, 1985)
(3) The Horse Thieves (Tian Zhunagzhuang, 1986)
(4) Red Sorghum (Zhang Yimou, 1987)
Word limit: minimum 500 English words (Chinese 800 words).
You need to make your argument based on the required readings, class lecture, and your own thoughts. You need to cite your sources when using other people’s writings. Remember to include a cover page with all the vital information.

Read and understand the assignment completely. Read all of the Course Notes and

Read and understand the assignment completely. Read all of the Course Notes and Writing Workshop notes, as well as the assigned textbook pages. Too often we have encountered wonderfully written essays that left out some key parts of the assignment, and have had to deduct points from a student that is clearly capable of writing a strong assignment.
Use proper terminology. Be sure to review the terminology from all previous modules and to use the specific film analysis terms where appropriate. These terms are what help the reader “see” what’s in the image – without them the reader either has to guess what you mean or rely on your say-so.
Be specific and use concrete examples. Whenever you make a claim about the film – whether it is about a character trait, a formal element used for a specific purpose, a narrative structure, or anything else, you must follow it up with a concrete example from the film. This example must involve a description of a specific case of the thing you are arguing for as it appears in the film, using proper terminology.
Preparation. The following steps allow you to prepare to write a strong critical essay:
1. Read about the film and develop some starting questions you will ask yourself during the viewing.
2. Actively view the film at least 3 times, each time focusing more and more squarely on scenes, formal elements, or events that you will want to discuss in your paper. Make a note of where they appear in the film.
3. Select a methodology that will best suit your argument.
4. Do background research to help you support your argument.
5. Write an outline including a thesis statement and supporting evidence in full sentences.
Organization. The following are the parts of a critical essay:
1. Introduction where you set up a problem or question about the film and present a thesis statement where you teach the reader something about the film in relation to the problem you have decided to tackle.
2. A body of the essay where each paragraph presents a single piece of supporting evidence. Supporting evidence may include a summary of your research, a character description or summary of an important theme of the plot, or a description of a key piece of textual evidence using appropriate terminology.
3. A conclusion where you expand or in some way problematize your thesis based on the information presented in the body of the essay.
Revise! Look for spelling, grammar, and sentence structure. But also keep an eye out for the flow of the argument, make sure you have proper transitions between your paragraphs, and be ruthless with repetitions or extraneous information that is left behind from earlier versions. DELETE RUTHLESSLY so your essay is clear and economical in both writing and structure. Have an outside reader review your essay for the things you have seen too many times and no longer notice.
Review all of your previous feedback and make sure you address the issues in your final paper.
Cite properly. The film time you mention a film in your essay, you must follow it up with parenthetical citation unless those things are mentioned previously in your paper. For example: The Birds (Hitchcock, 1963) or “Alfred Hitchcock’s film The Birds (1963)” or “Alfred Hitchcock released The Birds in 1963.”
When citing an article, be sure to include the page number in the text and full citation in the bibliography.
Be creative! Say something interesting, unique or unexpected, and then challenge yourself to back it up.

4 different movies with an assignment for each movie. One page for each assignme

4 different movies with an assignment for each movie. One page for each assignment
Workshop Assignment movies :
WS 1.Lost in Translation (Coppola, 2003)
WS 2. The Red Balloon (Lamorisse, 1956)
WS 3. Dead Man (Jarmusch, 2006)
WS 4. If Beale Street Could Talk (Jenkins, 10`8)
Each workshop is one page.

Read and understand the assignment completely. Read all of the Course Notes and

Read and understand the assignment completely. Read all of the Course Notes and Writing Workshop notes, as well as the assigned textbook pages. Too often we have encountered wonderfully written essays that left out some key parts of the assignment, and have had to deduct points from a student that is clearly capable of writing a strong assignment.
Use proper terminology. Be sure to review the terminology from all previous modules and to use the specific film analysis terms where appropriate. These terms are what help the reader “see” what’s in the image – without them the reader either has to guess what you mean or rely on your say-so.
Be specific and use concrete examples. Whenever you make a claim about the film – whether it is about a character trait, a formal element used for a specific purpose, a narrative structure, or anything else, you must follow it up with a concrete example from the film. This example must involve a description of a specific case of the thing you are arguing for as it appears in the film, using proper terminology.
Preparation. The following steps allow you to prepare to write a strong critical essay:
1. Read about the film and develop some starting questions you will ask yourself during the viewing.
2. Actively view the film at least 3 times, each time focusing more and more squarely on scenes, formal elements, or events that you will want to discuss in your paper. Make a note of where they appear in the film.
3. Select a methodology that will best suit your argument.
4. Do background research to help you support your argument.
5. Write an outline including a thesis statement and supporting evidence in full sentences.
Organization. The following are the parts of a critical essay:
1. Introduction where you set up a problem or question about the film and present a thesis statement where you teach the reader something about the film in relation to the problem you have decided to tackle.
2. A body of the essay where each paragraph presents a single piece of supporting evidence. Supporting evidence may include a summary of your research, a character description or summary of an important theme of the plot, or a description of a key piece of textual evidence using appropriate terminology.
3. A conclusion where you expand or in some way problematize your thesis based on the information presented in the body of the essay.
Revise! Look for spelling, grammar, and sentence structure. But also keep an eye out for the flow of the argument, make sure you have proper transitions between your paragraphs, and be ruthless with repetitions or extraneous information that is left behind from earlier versions. DELETE RUTHLESSLY so your essay is clear and economical in both writing and structure. Have an outside reader review your essay for the things you have seen too many times and no longer notice.
Review all of your previous feedback and make sure you address the issues in your final paper.
Cite properly. The film time you mention a film in your essay, you must follow it up with parenthetical citation unless those things are mentioned previously in your paper. For example: The Birds (Hitchcock, 1963) or “Alfred Hitchcock’s film The Birds (1963)” or “Alfred Hitchcock released The Birds in 1963.”
When citing an article, be sure to include the page number in the text and full citation in the bibliography.
Be creative! Say something interesting, unique or unexpected, and then challenge yourself to back it up.