Then choose 2 classmates to respond to in at least 50 words. Please go beyond, “

Then choose 2 classmates to respond to in at least 50 words. Please go beyond, “Great point!” Say things like, “I agree because…,” “I disagree because…” or, “I hadn’t thought of that, and …” Please make an attempt to reply to a classmate who wrote on a different prompt than you did. That way, you can show off your knowledge and thoughts about the work
the reading will be uploaded and the classmate replys

Your essay must address a specific essay topic. (See list below.) Indicate which

Your essay must address a specific essay topic. (See list below.) Indicate which topic you have selected. Giver your essay a title. Make sure that your essay has a clear argument. Stick to your essay topic, and make sure you analyse, paraphrase, and quote from your selected text or texts in order to support your argument. In other words, you will be doing close reading in your essay; and since it is an essay you will do more than that too. You will provide a context for your analysis. The context might be historical, or biographical, or thematic; or it might refer to literary genre, or literary history. This may all sound very difficult. But what your essay is about will largely be determined by the essay prompt you select. So that is a big help! You must write in clear, grammatical sentences that make up coherent and cohesive paragraphs. A paragraph should have a controlling idea, or a topic sentence. Just as sentences need to follow logically from one to the next, so do paragraphs. Your essay must have an introduction and a conclusion. You do not need to incorporate secondary, or critical, sources into your essay, though you can if you wish. You might find it useful to turn to the head notes and liner notes in the Norton anthologies, or to the pages of English Literature in Context, or American History: A Short Introduction. If you do use any of these critical sources (or others) by quoting from them and/or paraphrasing the author’s language, make sure you use proper citation in the body of your essay. Provide a bibliography, or works cited list. Use MLA citation, or some other form of documentation if you are comfortable with it. Select one of the following essay prompts: 1. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a comedy: it begins with disruption of the social order, and it ends with restoration of the social order. Yet this does not mean that the play is necessarily sympathetic with rulers, or equally sympathetic or unsympathetic with all of them. In this essay, stake out a position on how you think the rulers come out in the play. Why is this important? 2. The introduction to Benjamin Franklin’s life and work in The Norton Anthology of American Literature Volume 1 claims that “[the writings of Franklin] helped inaugurate the new national sensibility that emerged after the American Revolution”. Write an essay about Franklin in which you examine what is “new” in Franklin’s writing. 3. Geoffrey Chaucer, the “father of English Literature,” was a satirist. Write an essay that examines Chaucer’s satire as it is practiced upon any two of his pilgrims. What is the aim of the satire? 4. William Blake famously said that John Milton “was of the devil’s party without knowing it.” What do you think he meant by this? Argue for or against this claim, based upon your close reading and interpretation of selected lines from Book One of Paradise Lost. 5. Examine how Alexander Hamilton in Federalist no. 1 and James Madison in Federalist no. 10 make the case that effective government is needed to secure individual liberty. 6. Select either two or three poems from our Week 40 reading schedule and discuss what you think makes them Romantic poems. Pay attention to textual details. 7. Mary Wollstonecraft proclaims in A Vindication of the Rights of Women that “the soft phrases, susceptibility of heart, delicacy of sentiment, and refinement of taste, are almost synonymous with epithets of weakness.” What do you think she means?

Discuss your thoughts on the novel “The Maltese Falcon.” Consider the following:

Discuss your thoughts on the novel “The Maltese Falcon.” Consider the following: -What do you feel is the actual crime present at the heart of the narrative? -How did all of Chandler’s setting details set the mood of the novel? -Marlow comes in contact with thugs, lowlifes, cops, and the rich. Does he speak to everybody the same? -In thinking of the characters and their socioeconomic status levels in the book, what types of social critique if Chandler trying to make within The Big Sleep?

Your job will be to write an argumentative/persuasive essay telling me whether o

Your job will be to write an argumentative/persuasive essay telling me whether or not you believe Beowulf is an ideal hero. You must tell me what a traditional “hero” is, and what you think a king SHOULD look like (using history and examples); you must tell me what kind of person Beowulf is; and then finally, answer the question based on your findings.
The paper must be 5 paragraphs long, in this order – Intro, Paragraph 1 on history of heroes and kings, Paragraph 2 on Beowulf’s background and personality, Paragraph 3 on your answer to the question and why you feel that way, Conclusion. Each paragraph must have at least 5 complete sentences.
Papers must hit a minimum length requirement of 2 FULL pages.
Papers must be written in Times New Roman, 12 pt font, double spaced.
Papers must have a creative title and a heading.
Headings should be in the left hand corner, and should include your name, Mrs. Barney, the class period, and the date.
Papers must be written in 3RD PERSON (no you’s or I’s).
This time, you may use up to 10 “be” verbs. (am, is, are, was, were, be, being, been) One point will be deducted for every “be” verb used after 10.

Prompt: In this rhetorical analysis, you will be arguing how the author/speaker

Prompt: In this rhetorical analysis, you will be arguing how the author/speaker uses rhetoric (strategies or devices) to make his purpose clear and convincing to his audience
Please DO NOT write about appeals as evidence but as result.
Good example: The author’s use of imagery inspires a feeling of ___ and creates pathos. This makes the argument convincing because ___
Bad example: This shows that the author is using pathos. This is convincing because___
You will be graded on
Did you have a thesis? (see how to deconstruct prompt notes)
Did you write body paragraphs in an organized manner (see body paragraph notes and Rhetorical Analysis: Body Paragraph 2022) Download Rhetorical Analysis: Body Paragraph 2022)
Did you understand the text? (see annotations you made)
Did you discuss the author’s purpose? (see precis)
Did you cite evidence from the text and analyze the evidence accurately? (see Rhetorical Analysis: Organization and Quotation 2022 Download Rhetorical Analysis: Organization and Quotation 2022)
Did you discuss how the use of rhetoric makes the text clear and convincing? (see Rhetorical Analysis: How to Connect Rhetorical Choices to Meaning Download Rhetorical Analysis: How to Connect Rhetorical Choices to Meaning)
Did you use multiple pieces of evidence and multiple rhetorical features?
Did you show a command of formal, academic English?

Assignment Two: A paper four pages long (1200-1500 words) , in MLA format with

Assignment Two: A paper four pages long (1200-1500 words) , in MLA format with at least two quotes from outside sources.
Select ONE of the following writing prompts:
1) Read Charles Simic: A Reunion with Boredom. What are the main points Simic makes about technology? List them for yourself. He makes some good points, I think. Could you defend technology against what he’s saying? For example: Imagine how your life would be right now if didn’t have the technology in your cell phone to rely on in this natural disaster.
With either the above prompts, DO THESE THINGS:
Use quotes from at least two sources. One source can be the class reading, and the other quote coming from an outside source you found on your own.
Explore the library databases.
Talk to people around you from a distance of at least six feet.
Read the prompt carefully, and list for yourself what the prompt asks you to do in your own words. Be sure to provide a response to each element of the prompt.
Use quotes from the authors themselves to make your points.
Think on the page. Don’t be afraid to express your own thoughts. Take your thinking and your writing that extra step beyond merely reporting what you read or found.
Be conversational. React to the source material you use. Enter a conversation with your sources and YOUR audience (which is larger than just me or your classmates).
Points Criteria for Grading
18-20 Made outstanding points. Was clear and thoughtful. Obvious high degree of effort was given to research and preparation. Outstanding critical analysis. Met all requirements for the prompt and provided proper academic documentation for the sources used.
15-17 Made several above-average points with clarity and thoughtfulness. Good effort was given in the research and execution of the essay. Above average critical analysis. Met most of the requirements for the prompt and provided proper academic documentation for the sources used.
13-14 Made a few points. Showed average clarity and thoughtfulness. Lacks a high degree of effort in research. Average critical analysis. Met some of the requirements for the prompt and provided documentation, but it was incomplete or in the wrong format.
10-12 Made some points but lacked clarity and thoughtfulness. Organization was random. Did not make an appropriate effort at research and displayed very little critical analysis. Reads like a first draft and doesn’t provide adequate information about your sources.
0-9 Few if any points. Confused and disorganized. No apparent effort at research. Completely lacks critical analysis. We need a conference before you prepare another draft for the grade.
The Think-Aloud checklist:
These are a list of elements, questions and actions that academic writers learn to identify in their
sources and ask themselves.
Predicting: Anticipating where the author is going from what you’ve already read.
Picturing: Using your mind’s eye and/or ear to help visualize a problem or issue.
Questioning: Engage in a conversation. Be active. Note questions that occur to you as you read.
Making Connections: Other points made: To your own experience: Other sources you are using:
Identifying a Problem: Identifying and defining the issue or issues.
Summarizing: Laying out the main points.
Use Fix-ups: Identify confusing passages and reread portions of the text for clarity and understanding.
As you read your source material, finish these statements:
I predict that…
I can picture…
A question I have is…
This is like…
This reminds me of…
I’m confused about…
I’ll reread this…
The big idea here is…
I think/believe/wonder…( make a comment of your own )

Prompt: In this rhetorical analysis, you will be arguing how the author/speaker

Prompt: In this rhetorical analysis, you will be arguing how the author/speaker uses rhetoric (strategies or devices) to make his purpose clear and convincing to his audience
Please DO NOT write about appeals as evidence but as result.
Good example: The author’s use of imagery inspires a feeling of ___ and creates pathos. This makes the argument convincing because ___
Bad example: This shows that the author is using pathos. This is convincing because___
You will be graded on
Did you have a thesis? (see how to deconstruct prompt notes)
Did you write body paragraphs in an organized manner (see body paragraph notes and Rhetorical Analysis: Body Paragraph 2022) Download Rhetorical Analysis: Body Paragraph 2022)
Did you understand the text? (see annotations you made)
Did you discuss the author’s purpose? (see precis)
Did you cite evidence from the text and analyze the evidence accurately? (see Rhetorical Analysis: Organization and Quotation 2022 Download Rhetorical Analysis: Organization and Quotation 2022)
Did you discuss how the use of rhetoric makes the text clear and convincing? (see Rhetorical Analysis: How to Connect Rhetorical Choices to Meaning Download Rhetorical Analysis: How to Connect Rhetorical Choices to Meaning)
Did you use multiple pieces of evidence and multiple rhetorical features?
Did you show a command of formal, academic English?

It is a 5 paragraph essay on the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, there are 5 pro

It is a 5 paragraph essay on the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, there are 5 prompts to choose from which I have attached below, as well as how it should be formatted, and the rubric. 4 out of the 5 prompts include biblical themes and say “integrate a Christian perspective regarding (theme)”. I have attached all instructions and useful things that the writer will need for the essay.

I’m to provide an essay regarding Naomi Shihab Nye and her poetry here are the f

I’m to provide an essay regarding Naomi Shihab Nye and her poetry here are the full instructions given by the prof: Papers will be typed in English, font 12 Garamond/Palatino/Times New Roman or any other academically standard font is acceptable, single-spaced, aligned to the left, spaced 6-pt after each paragraph. Please indent the first line of each new paragraph. Please number pages on both the top and bottom of the page. Please staple pages together on the left-hand side. Use a header to indicate your full name, the title of your work, and the page number. An example of a good header could appear in the following way: Somthing somthing 1 Redefining the Frontline in Denise Levertov’s War Poems Of course, there are other ways to organize a header; if you choose to organize your header differently, that’s fine, but please be sure to include all the relevant information. . Content: Both the final paper and the midterm paper—as a way to begin the process of the final paper— will be on the poet you have been assigned. If you have presented on a theorist, Derrida, Cixous, Showalter, or Schweik, you should be prepared to put the theorist in conversation with any poet we were learning through the semester (for example, what would post-structuralists say about Carolyn Forché devotion to a strict definition of war? Or, in what way does Dawn Lundry Martin’s war poems move beyond gynocriticism? or how can we build on Schweik’s outside-inside duality to advance a conversation about Naomi Shihab Nye? Feel free to come up with your own topics, of course!). When you are working on a claim for your paper, I would like it if you focused on the following: 1. Choose one single element in your poet’s body of poems that you want to survey, and look at many poems that could help further your claim. An example of a single element might be: Letter from the Homefront: Marianne Moore’s Positions on Gender in War or Violent Metaphors in Solmaz Sharif’s Poems 2. Choose a single poem and analyze the many intersections of spectrums in that poem. An example of a single poem might be: Intersectional Narrations of Drew Pham “How to Remember Your Ancestors’ Names.” 3. Put two poets in conversation: Your poet and another poet of your choosing. An example of a poetic conversation might be: Wendy Rose’s Poetic Critical Response to Carolyn Forché Call of Witness or Formation of Race Wars: Claudia Rankine and Barbera Tran Use The Poetic Form to Combat the Canon of War Poetry. Division: The midterm paper will include four main parts: 1) Title; 2) Summary Paragraph; 3) Introduction; 4) Bibliography. 1) Title: A paper’s title should be informative on the overarching theme that you are working on. You could also include a concise play on words as a title, then use a colon to provide a full informative title. For example, I used above the title Letter from the Homefront: Marianne Moore’s Positions on Gender in War “Letter from the Homefront” is just a pithy working title, whereas “Marianne Moore’s Positions on Gender in War” is the informative title. I could have just titled the paper “Marianne Moore’s Positions on Gender in War,” which would have been fine (including only the informative part). Still, I could not use only “Letter from the Homefront” as my title because it contains no information on the paper’s substance. 2) Summary Paragraph: A single paragraph that includes a brief representation of the paper in its entirety. 3) Introduction: 500-800 words. Ideally, this should include your central claim, the poem or poems you are working on, and your perspective. 4) Bibliography: your bibliography should include 10-20 items, academically correct in their citation. You can use MLA, Chicago, or another standard citation method, as long as you are consistent throughout. seeing how the poet I choose is Naomi Shihab Nye I would like the theme to revolve around the Palestinian conflicts if possible

Assignment Two: A paper four pages long (1200-1500 words) , in MLA format with

Assignment Two: A paper four pages long (1200-1500 words) , in MLA format with at least two quotes from outside sources.
Select ONE of the following writing prompts:
1) Read Charles Simic: A Reunion with Boredom. What are the main points Simic makes about technology? List them for yourself. He makes some good points, I think. Could you defend technology against what he’s saying? For example: Imagine how your life would be right now if didn’t have the technology in your cell phone to rely on in this natural disaster.
With either the above prompts, DO THESE THINGS:
Use quotes from at least two sources. One source can be the class reading, and the other quote coming from an outside source you found on your own.
Explore the library databases.
Talk to people around you from a distance of at least six feet.
Read the prompt carefully, and list for yourself what the prompt asks you to do in your own words. Be sure to provide a response to each element of the prompt.
Use quotes from the authors themselves to make your points.
Think on the page. Don’t be afraid to express your own thoughts. Take your thinking and your writing that extra step beyond merely reporting what you read or found.
Be conversational. React to the source material you use. Enter a conversation with your sources and YOUR audience (which is larger than just me or your classmates).
Points Criteria for Grading
18-20 Made outstanding points. Was clear and thoughtful. Obvious high degree of effort was given to research and preparation. Outstanding critical analysis. Met all requirements for the prompt and provided proper academic documentation for the sources used.
15-17 Made several above-average points with clarity and thoughtfulness. Good effort was given in the research and execution of the essay. Above average critical analysis. Met most of the requirements for the prompt and provided proper academic documentation for the sources used.
13-14 Made a few points. Showed average clarity and thoughtfulness. Lacks a high degree of effort in research. Average critical analysis. Met some of the requirements for the prompt and provided documentation, but it was incomplete or in the wrong format.
10-12 Made some points but lacked clarity and thoughtfulness. Organization was random. Did not make an appropriate effort at research and displayed very little critical analysis. Reads like a first draft and doesn’t provide adequate information about your sources.
0-9 Few if any points. Confused and disorganized. No apparent effort at research. Completely lacks critical analysis. We need a conference before you prepare another draft for the grade.
The Think-Aloud checklist:
These are a list of elements, questions and actions that academic writers learn to identify in their
sources and ask themselves.
Predicting: Anticipating where the author is going from what you’ve already read.
Picturing: Using your mind’s eye and/or ear to help visualize a problem or issue.
Questioning: Engage in a conversation. Be active. Note questions that occur to you as you read.
Making Connections: Other points made: To your own experience: Other sources you are using:
Identifying a Problem: Identifying and defining the issue or issues.
Summarizing: Laying out the main points.
Use Fix-ups: Identify confusing passages and reread portions of the text for clarity and understanding.
As you read your source material, finish these statements:
I predict that…
I can picture…
A question I have is…
This is like…
This reminds me of…
I’m confused about…
I’ll reread this…
The big idea here is…
I think/believe/wonder…( make a comment of your own )