Only math expert So it’s It’s the Ontario ACE program for math, you may have hea

Only math expert So it’s It’s the Ontario ACE program for math, you may have heard of it. It’s very basic elementary math, but there are several modules and tests. 6 in total and and a final ex am. And 7 assignments all with roughly 20 questions each with the final ex am with 29 questions

Choose one of the following topics and create a written response of 2-3 paragrap

Choose one of the following topics and create a written response of 2-3 paragraphs. Be sure to reference material we have covered in the class as well as your own ideas. You may make reference to anything we have discussed, studied, and learned throughout this course. Also, you may use your own personal knowledge to support your answer. You must write in 3rd person and be sure to maintain a formal and academic tone throughout the response.
1.  What makes Gatsby “great”?
OR
2.How did Hamlets urge for Revenge inevitably lead to his downfall. Please use specific events from Hamlet

Multimedia Presentation In this assignment, you will create a correctable code f

Multimedia Presentation In this assignment, you will create a correctable code for a list of key words. Your task is to create an efficient, correctable code for a list that contains at least 6 key words. The words in your code will be represented as binary strings using only 0’s and 1’s. Stringent correctability requirements mean your code must have a minimum distance of 3.
– First, watch the following two videos, then read the following information to understand the definitions for bit, binary word, code, codewords, Hamming distance, and minimum distance of a code:
Video 1: Parity Checksums
Video 2: Hamming distance
Consider a sequence of 0’s and 1’s of length n.  This can be represented by an n-tuple of 0’s and 1’s such as (1,0,1,1) if n=4.  If V={0,1}, then we can form the product of V with itself n times and denote it by Vn.  So Vn={(a1, a2, …, an)|ai∈{0,1}}. Vn consists of all possible binary words of length n.  We can define a metric on Vn called the Hamming distance dH as follows:
For binary words x and y of length n, dH(x, y) is the number of places in which x and y differ.
Given this metric, Vn is now a metric space, and the topology induced by this metric is the discrete topology on Vn since the topology induced by a metric on a finite set is the discrete topology, and Vn is finite. 
To send a message using binary words, not all of Vn will be used; rather, only a subset of Vn will be used.  A subset C of Vn is called a code of length n, and the binary words in C are called codewords.  The smallest Hamming distance between any two codewords in C is called the minimum distance of the code C.
It turns out that, if a code C of length n is designed so that the minimum distance of C is d, then any binary word that had up to d-1 errors can be detected.  Furthermore, any binary word that had floor((d−1)/2) or fewer errors can be corrected. [Here, floor is the floor function; for example, floor(3.6)=3 and floor(8)=8.]
Now, you’re ready to create your correctable code. – Create a code consisting of binary codewords. – The code must meet three requirements   — Contain at least 6 codewords   — Have a minimum distance of 3 (explain why a min distance of 4 is no better than 3)   — Maintain efficiency by using the fewest number of bits per codeword as possible – Clearly document and describe your code: what it is, why you chose it, etc. – Discuss how topology relates to the selection of your code and the Hamming metric
A few notes about format: use MS PowerPoint for your presentation; develop a presentation that is 10-15 slides in length; incorporate audio files into your presentation in order to explain your work; use Equation Editor for all mathematical symbols, e.g. x ∈ X or Cl(A) ⋂ Cl(X-A); and select fonts, backgrounds, etc. to make your presentation look professional.  
Course and Learning Objectives This Writing Assignment supports the following Course and Learning objectives: CO-4 Determine if a topological space is a metric space and generate a topology from a metric. LO-13: Understand the definitions of a metric and metric space. LO-14: Develop a topology from a metric. 

1 page no apa format  class will be Statistics MAT 220 Access the course catalog

1 page no apa format 
class will be Statistics MAT 220
Access the course catalog and review the description of the course(s) you have registered to take for next mod. The undergraduate course catalog begins around page 220, depending on the version you are using.Post a response to the appropriate prompt(s) below:
If you will be taking a course in your major, discuss how you anticipate that this course will contribute to your knowledge base and career preparation.  Consider doing research to find an article that supports your statements.
If you will be taking a general education course, discuss the benefits of a broad knowledge base beyond your major topic of study.  Cite reference(s) that support your statements.
If you will be taking an elective, discuss why you find the course interesting.
If you will be graduating upon completion of this course, congratulations!  Please discuss how you will use your degree to further your career.

When am I ever going to use this? Math instructors hear these words on a daily b

When am I ever going to use this?
Math instructors hear these words on a daily basis.  Many of us have developed personalized, canned responses so that we always have an answer prepared. 
In this forum, students should discuss why it might be valuable for a non-mathematician, non-engineer to have an appreciation and/or a working understanding of higher level mathematics, even if the computations will not be part of their daily routine.  Also up for comment:  why might there be intrinsic value in obtaining knowledge outside of one’s chosen field of expertise?
Please post an original statement addressing the question posed, then take the time to comment on at least two of your classmates’ posts.