Weekly Discussion Board Posts Discussion Board posting is an important part of t

Weekly Discussion Board Posts
Discussion Board posting is an important part of the activities of LIT 1000 Internet. Generally, the more you participate (post), the better score you will get on the Discussion component of your grade. However, your postings must be substantive, as explained below.
By substantive, I mean that your Discussion Board post must have the following attributes:
The post is complete–it makes sense and makes a point of some kind.
The thought expressed is well-connected to the topic at hand.
Always read the criteria for the weekly discussion.
The writing demonstrates knowledge of the appropriate terminology and concepts for the topic.
The writing is free of grammatical and spelling errors and is otherwise technically competent.
You are expected to actively participate in the Discussion Board assignments. This means you should log on to the Discussion Board a few times a week to see what is happening there. 
Weekly Discussions
Each Monday by 6:00 p.m. you will be posting three paragraphs for the two stories you are assigned to read each week. 
Note, a well-written objective paragraph consists of 7-12 sentences. You are not re-writing the story, but summarizing in your own words, without the usage of quotes or copying the story. No first or second person usage. 
The first two paragraphs are your well-written summaries of the two assigned stories for that week. The third paragraph consists of responding to my question or comment posted in the weekly discussion. Points will be deducted if the above criteria is not met.
The three paragraphs must be typed in the provided box, and not as an attachment. A zero grade will be earned if any discussion has an attachment. Again, three paragraphs are the format each week. The weekly three paragraphs are due on Monday by 6:00 p.m.
You are using the comment box in the Discussions to type and submit. No attachments are allowed, and will not be given credit. You must use the comment box to post your work. This applies to all Discussion postings.
Once you have posted the three paragraphs, you will then have access to the class discussion. 
The first initial posting is graded, so be sure to include the three paragraph criteria, and proof for grammar, punctuation, and spelling errors. 

Here is some information you might want to share with your classmates in paragra

Here is some information you might want to share with your classmates in paragraph one:
Your name and a little personal background about yourself;
Your interests, hobbies, sports;
Your Future plans;
Your Major;
What courses you are currently taking and/or plan to take?
In paragraph two, please respond to the following:  
Why are you taking LIT2000?
What are your experiences with literature?
What are your expectations of this course?
Discuss a piece of literature you have read that has made an impact on you.
In paragraph three, please respond to the following: 
Share your reflection on the Introduction chapter from the textbook. It is provided in Module 1: Lesson 1.

Instructions Read the 4 excerpts from the Kojiki provided, then participate in o

Instructions
Read the 4 excerpts from the Kojiki provided, then participate in our discussion of the texts.
You have been randomly assigned to small discussion groups, and should plan on posting your initial response to our discussion outlined below by Tuesday before midnight.  Plan to return to the discussion later and respond at least 2 more times (more is better) to your peers at any point before midnight on Thursday.  
Discussion Guidelines
Please follow these guidelines when participating in the online discussions:
Share your thoughts and experiences as your own. Try not to generalize or speak for others.
Listen to the content of what others say. If you don’t understand someone’s view, ask them to explain, don’t judge.
Disagreement shows the complexity of these issues and helps us learn. Feel free to disagree, but do so in a respectful manner. This is an open forum for all participants to brainstorm and explore new ideas.
Keep personal information confidential (within this course).
Remember that it is easy to misinterpret written communication. Sometimes written comments may inadvertently seem impolite or could otherwise be taken the wrong way – strive to really explain yourself and avoid making assumptions about other people’s intentions.
See Course Syllabus for Online Discussion Rubric.
Discussion Focus:
Discussion Questions
(ADDRESS ALL QUESTIONS, even if you find yourself writing more about some than others)
1) What are the characteristics of the creation myths, fertility, and the early gods?
Feel free to compare other myth histories you might be familiar with, but also cite specific details from our Kojiki texts, and cite page numbers, when you make those comparisons.
2) What are the fetish objects we read about in the Philippe translation?   What does the geneology detail do for the audience? What does it seek to indicate? 
3) What is heroic in the Yamato Hero episode? What should a hero do, or not do?
4) What meaning do you understand through the actions of the 2 brothers in “Luck of the Sea and Luck of the Mountain”?  What are recurrent elements, already, for Kojiki? Is this episode entertaining? Didactic? What role does it serve? 
5) Question of translation – what are the pros and cons to the translation choices made by Ury & Borgen, Philippe, and Chamberlain/Keene? Do you have a favorite? Why?

Before midnight  Three of your students have specific learning disabilities in t

Before midnight 
Three of your students have specific learning disabilities in the area of reading; one has been diagnosed with ASD, and two have emotional and behavioral disorders which affect their academics in all areas. Two students have mild intellectual disabilities and one student is a speech and language impaired student who is struggling with reading.One student was retained and is repeating fifth grade, and one is a new student whose records have not yet arrived, but reports this is his second time in fifth grade.All of your students are decoding and comprehending at approximately a second to third grade reading level. All attend general education classes for at least part of the day. Eight of the nine students are males who show an interest in science and nonfiction texts, while your female student considers herself to be a fairy princess, she adores Disney, and she detests all the topics the other students love.Review Appendix B of the Common Core Standards and select a fifth-grade exemplar informational text.Using the “COE Lesson Plan Template,” create a lesson plan designed to meet the specific needs of the students in your class that enhances language development and communication skills, and incorporates:
The chosen fifth grade exemplar informational text.
A Common Core Standard or other state standard specific to informational text.  
Assistive technology within the lesson and the lesson’s summative assessment.
In the “Rationale/Reflections” part of the lesson plan, write a 250-500 word rationale explaining your instructional choices. Be sure to address how the lesson enhances language development and communication skills. In addition, reflect upon how you would provide students feedback on formative assessments to prepare them for a summative assessment.APA format is not required, but solid academic writing is expected.This assignment uses a rubric. Review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.You are required to submit this assignment to LopesWrite. A link to the LopesWrite technical support articles is located in Class Resources if you need assistance.

1.  Who provided the basic story for the play? a. Raphael Holinshed    b. Thomas

1.  Who provided the basic story for the play?
a. Raphael Holinshed    b. Thomas Kyd  c. Saxo-Grammaticus 
2.  Where is the play mainly set?
a.  a castle in Denmark  b.  a boat to England  c. a graveyard  d. battlements
3.  One theme of the play is sin and redemption. Explain.
4.  Hamlet remarks ‘Frailty, thy name is woman’ (1.2.146). What is he talking about? Why does he apply this to Gertrude?
5.  Some critics say that Hamlet’s grief over his father’s death is ‘in excess of the facts’. Do you agree? Why/why not?
6.  What is the purpose of The Mousetrap for Hamlet? (2 answers)
a.  to trap Claudius  b. to showcase Hamlet’s writing talents    c. to confirm the ghost’s claim     d. light relief    e. mise-en-abyme
7.  What do ghosts mean to Elizabethans? How does Shakespeare use the Ghost in Hamlet?
8.  Hamlet seeks revenge for his father’s death. So do Laertes and Fortinbras. Who is the fourth character who seeks revenge?
9.  ‘Thus conscience does make cowards of us all’ (3. 1. 83). What does Hamlet mean by this?
10.  Imagine you are Polonius. Advise your sister, who is about to enter GUST. Use his ideas from 1. 3. 58-80, translated into modern English. 
11.  Ophelia says ‘you must wear your rue with a difference’ (4. 5. 179). What might she mean?
12. Did Gertrude know about King Hamlet’s murder? Why/why not?
12.  Why does Hamlet fight with Laertes over Ophelia’s grave (5. 1. 225)?
13.  Which of these is not an old friend of Hamlet’s?
a.  Horatio  b. Rosencrantz  c. Guildernstern  d. Fortinbras
14.  Hamlet says he knows ‘a hawk from a handsaw’ (2. 2. 348). Does he? Give reasons for your answer.
15.  ‘There is a divinity that shapes our ends, Rough-hew them how we will’ (10-11. 5.2). True for Hamlet, or not?

Hey tutor, please choose one of the short stories below and do the questions 40

Hey tutor, please choose one of the short stories below and do the questions
40      Short Stories: A Portable Anthology
“The      Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin
“Araby”      by James Joyce
“A      Hunger Artist” by Franz Kafka
“The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson 

Imagined Dialogue: you’ll write an imagined dialogue (or larger conversation) b

Imagined Dialogue: you’ll write an imagined dialogue (or larger
conversation) between two or more characters from at least two different fantasy series we mentioned below. You will use this exercise in order to demonstrate your knowledge of the
major themes of the course(religion and fantasy) and the different styles and perspectives of each author
Into the Wardrobe: C.S. Lewis
and the Narnia Chronicles by
David C. Downing 
A Field Guide to Narnia by Colin
Duriez
The Gospel According to
Tolkien: Visions of the Kingdom
in Middle-earth by Ralph C.
Wood
J.R.R. Tolkien: Myth, Morality,
and Religion by Richard L.
Purtill
The Evolution of Tolkien’s
Mythology: A Study of the
History of Middle-earth by
Elizabeth A. Whittingham
Game of Thrones versus History:
Written in Blood edited by
Brian A. Pavlac
The Ultimate Game of Thrones
and Philosophy: You Think or
Die edited by Eric J. Silverman
and Robert Arp
Game of Thrones and
Philosophy: Logic Cuts Deeper
than Swords edited by Henry
Jacoby
Women in Game of Thrones:
Power, Conformity and
Resistance by Valerie Estelle  

1. Two Summaries Read “Medon Meets a Cyclops” and “Epic Ways of Killing a Woman,

1. Two Summaries
Read “Medon Meets a Cyclops” and “Epic Ways of Killing a Woman,” then write a summary of that article, no more than ½ page in length, which explains the article’s main claim and the arguments it uses to support that claim. 
2. One poem
Write 20-40 lines of epic poetry about your life.  How you make it poetry is up to you; you may want to use rhyme, meter or other formal devices.  How you make it “epic” is also up to you, but you can apply some of the things you’ve learned in lecture and section to make what you write more like the Odyssey.  Like Odysseus, you should not feel bound by a strict respect for the truth. 

Compare between Wordsworth’s poems: You can use timetable or discuss the ideas o

Compare between Wordsworth’s poems: You can use timetable or discuss the ideas one after the other in each poem.
I wandered lonely as a cloud & The Solitary reaper
Focus on the followings:
1- The setting and the theme presented
2- Figures of Speech (3 at least in each poem) with explanation.
3- Comment of the end of the two poems

Compare and Contrast Authors of Indigenous World Literature Type: forum Select t

Compare and Contrast Authors of Indigenous World Literature Type: forum
Select two authors from the indigenous readings to compare and contrast. You may want to select one from each country and compare and contrast the Native American experience with that of the Aboriginal Australian experience.
What did the two populations have in common?
How were their experiences different?
How did the authors represent their time period and their culture?
How did they represent mainstream society vs. the indigenous people?
What are common traits in both worlds?
How are myths and legends utilized by both indigenous populations?