Please help with attached quiz it has steps from 1-13. the main 3 questions are

Please help with attached quiz
it has steps from 1-13. the main 3 questions are 14-16. that i need help with, then afterwards please go to the bottom where it says (Section 2) and upload images of refracting Telescope, Newtonian Telescope, Coude Telescope, Cassegrain Telescope, and image of four telescope sketches.
very fast and simple lab.

Please help with attached quiz it has steps from 1-13. the main 3 questions are

Please help with attached quiz
it has steps from 1-13. the main 3 questions are 14-16. that i need help with, then afterwards please go to the bottom where it says (Section 2) and upload images of refracting Telescope, Newtonian Telescope, Coude Telescope, Cassegrain Telescope, and image of four telescope sketches.
very fast and simple lab.

Homework Assignment Instructions SPST 502 Week 4 Homework Assignment In preparat

Homework Assignment Instructions SPST 502 Week 4 Homework Assignment In preparation for the Week 4 Homework Assignment: Review the information in Lesson 4 and read Chapters 7-8 of our textbook. Questions 1-6 are based on the information in Chapter 7. Questions 7-16 are based on the information in Chapter 8 (Assume the average Earth Radius = 6378 km). By the End of Week 4, Submit your Answers to the Following Questions: Answer the following questions based on the following information: An observation satellite is being sent to from Earth to Jupiter. The satellite will leave from Earth from a parking orbit of 8,846 km and arrive at Jupiter into a parking orbit of 97,992 km. Based on this information and additional data from appendix D: Determine the semimajor axis of the transfer orbit? What is the specific mechanical energy of the transfer orbit? Based on information in Problem 1: What is the specific mechanical energy of the Earth in its orbit around the Sun? What is the velocity of the Earth around the Sun? What is the velocity in transfer orbit at Earth? Determine the velocity at infinity near Earth (at Earth’s SOI)? Based on information in Problem 1: Determine the specific mechanical energy of Jupiter in its orbit around the Sun. Calculate the velocity of Jupiter around the Sun. Calculate the velocity in transfer orbit at Jupiter. What is the velocity at infinity near Jupiter (at Jupiter’s SOI)? Based on the information in Problem 1: Find the Satellite’s specific mechanical energy on its hyperbolic-escape trajectory (at Earth’s SOI). What is the Satellite’s velocity in the circular parking orbit around Earth? What is the Satellite’s velocity on the hyperbolic-escape trajectory at the parking orbit radius? Calculate the velocity change the Satellite needs to enter the hyperbolic-escape trajectory. Based on the information in Problem 1: Calculate the Satellite’s specific mechanical energy on its hyperbolic-arrival trajectory (at Jupiter’s SOI). Find the Satellite’s velocity on the hyperbolic-arrival trajectory at its parking-orbit’s altitude. What is the Satellite’s velocity in the circular, parking orbit at Jupiter? Calculate the Satellite’s velocity change needed to enter its circular parking orbit at Jupiter. Based on information from Problem 1-5: Calculate the Satellite’s total velocity change for the mission to Jupiter. Compute the time of flight for the Satellite’s mission to Jupiter (in days, hrs., min. and sec.). The Chandra X-Ray Observatory has an apogee altitude of 140,000 km and a perigee altitude of 10,000 km. Its inclination is i = 35.5°, its right ascension of the ascending node is O = 149°, and the argument of perigee is ? = 305°. Assume a true anomaly of v = 172°. Special Note: Ensure your calculator mode (degrees or radians) matches the type of data you are calculating in the problem. Be sure to carry all radian figures out to 4 significant decimal places. Determine the semimajor axis Determine the eccentricity of the orbit. Calculate the mean motion (in Radians per second and revolutions per day). Based on the information in Problem 7: Determine the initial eccentric anomaly (give answer in degrees and radians). Calculate the future eccentric anomaly, when the true anomaly is v = 272° (give answer in degrees and radians). Based on the information in Problem 7: Determine the initial mean anomaly (give answer in radians and degrees). Calculate the future mean anomaly when the true anomaly is v = 272° (give answer in radians and degrees). Based on the information in Problem 7: Determine the time of flight (in hours, minutes, and seconds) to travel from its initial true anomaly of v = 172° to the new true anomaly of v = 272°. Based on the information in Problem 7: What will be the mean anomaly be 64 hours from our initial true anomaly of v = 172° (give answer in radians and degrees)? Based on the information in Problem 7: Determine the eccentric anomaly 64 hours from the initial true anomaly of v = 172° (give answer in radians and degrees). Based on the information in Problem 7: What will the future true anomaly be 64 hours after the initial true anomaly of v = 172°? The BRIC Sat-2 has an apogee altitude of 847 km and a perigee altitude of 300 km. Its current inclination is i = 96°, its current right ascension of the ascending node is O = 240°, and its current augment of perigee is ? = 225°. Assume no corrections to orbital path. If the satellite were to gain an average of 0.125 km per day and increase its eccentricity by 0.000016 per day, determine the following 120 days from now: Determine the semimajor axis. Determine the Eccentricity Based on the information in Problem 14, if the right ascension of the ascending node increases 1.5° per day and the argument of perigee decreases by 2.2° per day: Determine the satellite’s inclination after 120 days. Determine the satellite’s right ascension of the ascending node after 120 days. Determine the satellite’s argument of perigee be after 120 days. The Black Sky Pathfinder 1 Observation Satellite has an apogee altitude of 790 km and a perigee altitude of 480 km. What inclination does this satellite need to be in to remain sun-synchronous with this give orbital information (hint: Use the equation in Figure 8-10).

Learning Goal: I’m working on a astronomy writing question and need an explanati

Learning Goal: I’m working on a astronomy writing question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.you will do some research on potential catastrophic events, and how mankind may prevent our own extinction. You will pick one of the topics below, research it, and write a 2+ page paper on it. (choose any topic you want below)Avoiding an Impact: Research some of the methods developed by scientists and the world’s governments as possible means to change the path of a large asteroid or comet that is on a crash collision with the Earth. Be sure to look at a minimum of 3 possible methods developed, explain how these methods work, and express in opinion in your confidence in them working. Moving Mankind: A few years ago, Stephen Hawking caused a bit of controversy when he said:”Life on Earth is at the ever-increasing risk of being wiped out by a disaster such as sudden global warming, nuclear war, a genetically engineered virus or other dangers … I think the human race has no future if it doesn’t go into space.”What do you think is our best means to avoid cosmic extinction? How high on the priority list should something of this nature be? Research a few of the ways in which mankind could become extinct (both from space, Earth and ourselves) that would be prevented if we had multiple colonies on multiple planets/moons. Come up with an idea of how often an event of this nature could take place, and based on this, give your opinion as to how much of our resources should be put towards this effort.Path of Destruction: On March 5, 1979, a very powerful burst of gamma ray radiation moved its way through our solar system from somewhere outside of the solar system. This radiation was detected by many US and Soviet space probes as well as did damage to Department of Defense satellites, among others. Research this event, the amount of destruction done and the source of the radiation. Describe what happened, what object was the likely cause, why the object was able to emit such a vast amount of radiation, and discuss what the odds of a similar, or worse, event of this variety taking place. General requirements for the project are as follows:Use at least 3 reputable sources. Two must be from journal articles found on our library website.
Turn in a title page and a works cited page or bibliography. This does not get included in page count.
Put thought into your opinion. You will be graded on how well put together your ideas are.
You can include no more than one quote that is no more than 50 words long.
Plagiarism will be dealt with as outlined in the syllabus. Anything not in your own words will count as plagiarism. Just changing a few words of someone else’s sentence is still plagiarizing.
Requirements: 2+ pages   |   .doc file

I will be uploading the instructions, articles, as well as all of the power poin

I will be uploading the instructions, articles, as well as all of the power points needed to complete the assignment. Please review instructions carefully! Please do the follow articles: 2&3&4 please. (from Lesson 2&3&4). The link below has all the powerpoints/reading needed for the lessons.
Link: https://we.tl/t-ylGiLocB14

Title of research paper along with its Abstract is needed by the 8th to get appr

Title of research paper along with its Abstract is needed by the 8th to get approval for topic There are thousands of interesting and exciting topics in Astronomy that you can find or you will see in this course. Select a topic and study a little bit more and beyond the textbook. Ask your own questions and try to find your answers in academic and professional references in Astronomy like journals, books and etc. (search online, you can find online access to many Astronomy references). Since your paper has to be about an ongoing scientific research in Astronomy, topics like Constellations, Mythology, History of science, Astrology, Apollo mission, and etc. are not accepted. Research Topic: Research Topic is the topic of your research paper and is a brief statement (a paragraph) about your research. Submit your Research Topic by no later Friday, November 5th so I can approve and track it. Research papers will not be accepted without getting topic approval. Research Paper Format: The research paper must have the following sections: Title Abstract Introduction Text Body Conclusion Reference List Format: The research paper has to be in your own words. Do not copy and paste from the references. The text body section (excluding abstract, introduction, tables, figures, conclusion and references) must be more than 3 pages. Typed and double-spaced. Type should be 12 pt. Times New Roman. (not abstract) Only abstract paragraph has be to 11 pt. Times New Roman. Cite every piece of information that comes from a Reference. References cited in the text must be in this style: (Author’s last name or Publisher Publication Year). For example: (Farahmandi 2017), (NASA 2016), … References cited in the text must appear in the Reference List. You must use 3 or more different references. Use professional citation styles Figures and tables must have captions and be referred to in the text. The paper has to be in PDF or Word format (pdf, doc, and docx) and name it Your Last name_First name_Paper Title (e.g. Farahmandi_Alireza_The Volcanoes on Venus and Mars.pdf). For PDF, you can use Google Docs and go to File > Download as > PDF document. You are required to post the title and the abstract of your research paper for your classmates in the seventh week of class. (Module 7: Post Research Paper Title and Abstract) Submit your paper in PDF or Word format by the end of Friday, December 10th. Take a look at this professional article to get familiar with formatting. It is a download link of an article by Alan Dressler et. al. in Astronomy: http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0408490v1.pdf (Links to an external site.) The Astrophysical Journal, Volume 617, Issue 2, pp. 867-878 Follow the same citation and reference styles in your paper. For this research paper, the Title is: Studying the Star Formation Histories of Galaxies in Clusters from Composite Spectra And the Abstract is: Abstract: We have formed “composite spectra” by combining the integrated-light spectra of individual galaxies in 8 intermediate-redshift and 12 low-redshift clusters of galaxies. Because these composite spectra have much higher signal-to-noise ratios than individual galaxy spectra, they are particularly useful in quantifying general trends in star formation for galaxy populations in distant clusters, z > 0.3. By measuring diagnostic features that represent stellar populations of very different ages, a grand-composite spectrum can reflect the fractions of those populations as accurately as if excellent spectral measurements were available for each galaxy. Measuring the equivalent widths of spectral features in composite spectra is especially well-suited for comparing cosmic variance of star formation in clusters at a given redshift, or comparing clusters over a range of redshifts. When we do this we find that [O II] emission and especially Balmer absorption is strong in each of our intermediate-redshift clusters, and completely separable from a sample of 12 present-epoch clusters, where these features are weak. Specifically, we show by comparing to the H-delta strengths of present-epoch populations of continuously star-forming galaxies that the higher-redshift samples must contain a much higher fraction of starburst galaxies than are found today in any environment.

Goal: Watch a TED talk about material relevant to this course in YouTube. There

Goal: Watch a TED talk about material relevant to this course in YouTube. There is a listing here: https://www.ted.com/talks?page=1&topics%5B%5D=astronomy Some that I think would be especially relevant are: https://www.ted.com/talks/emily_levesque_a_stellar_history_of_modern_astronomy https://www.ted.com/talks/risa_wechsler_the_search_for_dark_matter_and_what_we_ve_found_so_far https://www.ted.com/talks/enrico_ramirez_ruiz_your_body_was_forged_in_the_spectacular_death_of_stars https://www.ted.com/talks/juna_kollmeier_the_most_detailed_map_of_galaxies_black_holes_and_stars_ever_made Evidence: You should write (word processed, suitably formatted) a summary of the main points made (about half a page would be appropriate). You should state how it is relevant to the course (e.g. cite lecture or chapter references), and any questions it raised in your mind. Lecture Topics Include – Galaxies cosmology black holes neutron stars stellar deaths stellar evolution

Describe how men and women converse with each other. Explain what the possible d

Describe how men and women converse with each other. Explain what the possible disconnects are in these conversations. What does Dr. Deborah Tannen have to say about the subject, and do you agree? What do men and women need to do in order to get on the same linguistic page?