Write an essay that identifies a theme of Fahrenheit 451 and establishes the rel

Write an essay that identifies a theme of Fahrenheit 451 and establishes the relevance of that theme in twenty-first-century Western civilization. Your essay should be balanced between identifying a theme in the novel and tying that theme to the twenty-first century. Your essay should include the following structure:
Introduction
• Your essay must begin with a clear hook that introduces the theme you have identified.
• You may also need to define the terms relevant to your argument. Your introduction may, therefore, require two paragraphs.
• The last sentence of the introduction must be a thesis statement that identifies a theme of Fahrenheit 451 and establishes the relevance of that theme in twenty-first century Western civilization.
Thesis statement template: In Fahrenheit 451, author Ray Bradbury warns of the dangers of ________, an issue that continues today.
Body
• You must have at least five body paragraphs that develop your essay.
• Each body paragraph must begin with a clear topic sentence that specifically states the topic and focus of the paragraph.
• A good supporting paragraph must contain at least seven well developed sentences.
• You must incorporate specific examples from the novel into your own writing to support your interpretation of theme. Your interpretation of theme must include both a subject and a claim. For example, censorship may be a subject of the novel, but you must consider what opinion the author is making about censorship to complete your identification of theme.
• For supporting evidence linking theme to the twenty-first century, you should use recent articles and/or books of non-fiction.
• As always, you should provide clear attributions and complete and accurate citations for all outside sources (including the novel) used in your essay. The majority of the sources you use should be incorporated into your writing in the form of summary and paraphrase. No more than 10 percent of your essay can include quotations.
Conclusion
Finally, end your essay with a concluding paragraph that echoes the hook and brings the essay to an effective close.
TURNING IN YOUR ASSIGNMENT
Submit your work in a two-pocket folder. Keep in mind that this folder will be the first impression that your essay makes on its reader. Your folder must include the following
• A copy of the final draft of your essay (the one that I am going to grade) needs to be in the left pocket of the folder.
• The other pocket must include copies of all of your source material.
o This material should be highlighted to indicate the sections used.
o Copy and highlight relevant sections of any books you use as sources, including the novel.
GRADING
I will grade your essay on the following:
• Is the essay structured correctly? (introduction, body, conclusion)
• Is there a thesis statement? Is it the last sentence of the introduction?
• Are there topic sentences which elaborate upon the thesis statement?
• Is there support for each topic sentence, and is this support on track with the topic sentence which it intends to support?
• Do you keep in mind who the audience is, what it knows about the subject, and what will make the essay interesting to the audience?
• Is the support well-developed? Does the support digress at any point?
• Are all sources documented internally with in-text citations?
• Are all sources documented externally on a works cited page?
• Is the essay coherent? Unified? Does it flow smoothly and use transitions?
• Is there a minimum of mechanical and grammatical errors?
• Is the essay formatted according to MLA requirements?
• Does the essay use information from six sources? Is one of those sources Fahrenheit 451?
WRITING REQUIREMENTS
Be sure to do the following:
• Use the MLA research paper format without title page.
• Provide explicit thesis and topic sentences.
• Use no fewer than six sources. One of the sources must be Fahrenheit 451.
• Include a works cited page.
• Include a MINIMUM OF FIVE FULL PAGES but no more than six*, having one-inch margins, and using 12-point Times New Roman typeface.
*NOTE: This does not include the works cited page.
INTEGRATED SOURCE REQUIREMENTS
Your essay should include the following:
• One direct quotation introduced with a colon.
• An integrated quote for each of the five sources.
• One block quotation (no longer than four lines).
• One paraphrase (Highlight the paraphrase in your paper and include the original quote that you are paraphrasing on a page that is attached to your essay but is not a part of your essay. This page should come after your works cited page, and it should be labeled as original quote for the highlighted paraphrase.)

The paper needs to be a minimum of 5 pages, have a works cited page at the end,

The paper needs to be a minimum of 5 pages, have a works cited page at the end, it needs a intro, thesis, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. I have attached the directions for the assignment, a document with sources to use for the paper, and pictures of the in text article that should also be used for the paper. Please also follow the prompt and checklist on the document titled Essay_3.pdf please.

I am applying for a transfer to a 4 year university from college, majoring in Da

I am applying for a transfer to a 4 year university from college, majoring in Data Science.
University Transfer Application Essay Prompt (300 words limit):
Describe how you have taken advantage of a significant educational opportunity or worked to overcome an educational barrier you have faced.
Help me write up an experience which shows any one of these, or more at the same time:
1. strong leadership, hardworking character
2. good in computer science/programming

Imagine that you’re on an excavation dig and stumble upon the remains of your mo

Imagine that you’re on an excavation dig and stumble upon the remains of your most valuable possessions. What would you find buried in the rubble? A mixtape? Some love letters? Polaroids? Locks from your first haircut? Old movie stubs from a first date? The keys to your first car?
Think about all of the items littered in this pit of curiosities and the rich histories that they carry with them. They’re your stories, of course. But they’re also part of a greater cultural narrative—they reflect values, fears, hopes, beliefs, etc.. Like DNA, each of these texts carries its own set of unique cultural codes—some for better and some for worse. If we take the time to read them, these codes can inform us about the world around us and our place within it.
For this project, you will present a visual analysis on the film of your choosing. Your goal: to identify a simple text in this world and deeply analyze its cultural implications. In other words, you’ll explore: what does this text say about (a) specific culture(s)? This analysis should gradually evolve from your basic observation of the text into a deeper conversation about its cultural commentary. The driving force of this assignment is your ability to think critically and selectively about your selected text within a broader cultural context.
Form: This will be a presentation of 3-5 minutes, (not counting the time of the video or commercial you are analyzing) in which you will discuss the elements of that visual and its message. There will also be a research aspect of this presentation: you need to demonstrate that you have not only done the research, but that you can connect the subject of your research to the film you are presenting.
Presentations will: 1. Demonstrate a clearly defined stance delivered through a well-placed thesis statement.
2. Avoid lengthy passages of description (I can either envision or quickly reference your
text, so do not waste time describing it in detail).
3. Effectively communicate the underlying message of the text (its cultural codes) and
your support of those messages through explanation of the elements.
4. Include respectful language
5. Demonstrate control and empowered critical thinking
6. Demonstrate an understanding of documentation of sources. You will use a minimum of three credible sources from the library databases. Include your sources as a Works Cited page with your written outline.
When planning your analysis, follow these steps:
1. Choose your film. The simpler, the better. This will be the foundation of your entire analysis.
2. Establish the target audience for the text that you are analyzing. How can you tell? Get specific in
figuring out exactly who this film appeals to. Investigate why it appeals to that particular demographic.
3. Determine specific cultures associated with the target audience. These might be sub-cultures, counter
cultures, pop cultures, cults, maybe even entire continents. The idea is to get specific about the culture
so that your analysis remains focused and your research remains relevant.
3. Establish the medium and distribution: Where and when do people encounter this text? Is it
online? A film? Consider the rating. Explain how this medium lends to your “reading” of the messages it carries
4. Establish the cultural codes. Identify what message the text sends to its intended audience.
The ideal X should be/do/have Y.
Note: You may identify as few or as many cultural codes as you deem necessary so long as you analyze them thoroughly.
5. The majority of your analysis should expose why you feel the way that you do about any cultural codes that the text communicates.
6. Get clear about what viewers of your presentation should take away about the text you have analyzed. This presentation should be succinct, with the elements you are analyzing clearly identified and discussed. Limit the number of elements you are using to support your thesis: it is better to go deep than to go wide.
7. Structure your presentation. Figure out what evidence you will include and in what order you will present the evidence. Remember to consider your purpose, your audience, and your topic.
In addition to your video, there will also be a written submission of a short outline of your presentation with a thesis statement and support statements, and a conclusion as to the cultural group the visual is targeting and why you think this.
Additional Instructions for the video:
1. Your video needs to be appropriate to the course. Use an appropriate vocabulary. This is still a college course and you should be respectful to your classmates.
2. Post your video on YouTube as “Unlisted” and email or Moodle message me the url so that I can grade it.
3. Your papers and videos are all due on the same date: November 14
here is a link of the rubric:
https://cctx.mrooms.net/pluginfile.php/341463/mod_assign/intro/Rubric%20for%20Oral%20Presentation%20of%20Nontraditional%20Text.pdf?time=1629743915754
I put that I need to talk between 3-5 minutes, so I think I have to make a video of myself talking, so maybe you can give like the presentation in the paper of what I’m going to say in the presentation for 3-4 minutes.

Prompt: aerial view of city during daytimeFor Essay 3, the culminating writing p

Prompt:
aerial view of city during daytimeFor Essay 3, the culminating writing project of this course, you will refine all the skills you’ve been working on thus far in English 1A (annotating, critical reading, point-by-point organization, supporting thesis-driven arguments, MLA citations, etc.), and add one more: research. Research can be an absolutely rewarding process, but also messy and extensive. l will walk you through this step-by-step, and if you stick to the schedule, you might even find some JOY in the process!!
For Essay 3, you will choose ONE city issue to read about and research. It can be anything that you would like to see change or anything you’re curious about, related to virtually any sector of city living (e.g., housing, education, transit, business, public works, etc.). Within your topic, you will identify some tension or debate that stakeholders are arguing about.
You will research the issue, and then compose an essay that explains the problem and argues for an appropriate solution*.
*Or “next steps” — most issues will be too complex to solve with one essay!
Though you will be informing your reader about the issue, its history, and how it impacts various stakeholders, your ultimate purpose is to persuade the audience to agree with your proposed call to action.
Guidelines
Your essay should be (all covered in this course):
Thesis-driven, and organized point-by-point
Supported by textual evidence (quote or paraphrase) from Moskowitz’s How to Kill a City and a minimum of five outside sources, though many students find they need more than five outside sources to write a successful essay. These outside sources must include:
at least one scholarly source (i.e., a peer-reviewed, academic journal article)
at least one article from the local media (i.e., local newspaper, podcast, or blog)
at least one personal interview (i.e., with a person impacted by or knowledgeable about the issue or involved in possible solutions)
Developed with at least one counterargument/ counter-perspective
Formatted in MLA style, including MLA in-text citations and a Works Cited page
8-10 pages in length

Prompt: aerial view of city during daytimeFor Essay 3, the culminating writing p

Prompt:
aerial view of city during daytimeFor Essay 3, the culminating writing project of this course, you will refine all the skills you’ve been working on thus far in English 1A (annotating, critical reading, point-by-point organization, supporting thesis-driven arguments, MLA citations, etc.), and add one more: research. Research can be an absolutely rewarding process, but also messy and extensive. l will walk you through this step-by-step, and if you stick to the schedule, you might even find some JOY in the process!!
For Essay 3, you will choose ONE city issue to read about and research. It can be anything that you would like to see change or anything you’re curious about, related to virtually any sector of city living (e.g., housing, education, transit, business, public works, etc.). Within your topic, you will identify some tension or debate that stakeholders are arguing about.
You will research the issue, and then compose an essay that explains the problem and argues for an appropriate solution*.
*Or “next steps” — most issues will be too complex to solve with one essay!
Though you will be informing your reader about the issue, its history, and how it impacts various stakeholders, your ultimate purpose is to persuade the audience to agree with your proposed call to action.
Guidelines
Your essay should be (all covered in this course):
Thesis-driven, and organized point-by-point
Supported by textual evidence (quote or paraphrase) from Moskowitz’s How to Kill a City and a minimum of five outside sources, though many students find they need more than five outside sources to write a successful essay. These outside sources must include:
at least one scholarly source (i.e., a peer-reviewed, academic journal article)
at least one article from the local media (i.e., local newspaper, podcast, or blog)
at least one personal interview (i.e., with a person impacted by or knowledgeable about the issue or involved in possible solutions)
Developed with at least one counterargument/ counter-perspective
Formatted in MLA style, including MLA in-text citations and a Works Cited page
8-10 pages in length

Two pages, double-spaced Be sure to read the general description of this assignm

Two pages, double-spaced
Be sure to read the general description of this assignment first. Then read this document
determine what questions to answer in your essay. Be sure to bring in evidence from the short story
to support your ideas, or evidence from outside sources, as needed. Include a Works Cited page at
the end to show what outside sources you used.
Assignment:
1. The first paragraph introduces the scholarly article, the author, and the topic. You need to
add a thesis: what is the bottom line point you are making in the essay? Your thesis is not
whether you agree with the author’s points in his/her article; your thesis is whether the
article is credible, based on all your analysis, so you should write your thesis last, really, after
you have completed your analysis.
2. The next section analyzes the content and strengths of the argument: is the article
convincing? Does it make sense? Are there areas that are weak and that you feel could be
explained more clearly or in more depth? Give examples and discuss.
3. Does the author show a bias toward the subject? How do you know? (For example, if the
author doesn’t use any sources at all, just uses his/her own opinion, this might be seen as a
bias or limited viewpoint on the topic). Bring in examples.
4. Based on your own reading of the poem, do you agree with this scholar? Disagree? Explain
why.
5. The last section examines the sources used by the author to support his or her findings.
Are these sources credible? Give one or two specific examples and explain. You might have
to look a few names up on the web to see if you can establish credibility. If there are no
sources, what can you say about this? Scholarly articles should use sources so what does this
mean in terms of credibility?
6. Add a brief conclusion that summarizes your main ideas.
7. Include a Works Cited page of all sources used in this essay.
In “The Red Convertible,”
Erdrich uses symbolism in a variety of ways. The most important symbol is the title car, the significance of which changes as the story unfolds. Erdrich’s use of symbolism in this way gives her story depth and complexity and enables her to communicate ideas and character developments without lengthy explanations. As a result, the red convertible embodies, at various points in the story, everything the story is meant to express.
Fraternal bonds, freedom, innocence, control, and wisdom–all of these themes are carried by one red convertible.
Perhaps the convertible’s greatest contribution to the story is as a symbol of the relationship between Lyman and Henry. Initially, it represents their close companionship. They bought it together on a whim, which demonstrates their willingness to share a major responsibility and to do so on impulse. After buying it, they took a summer-long road trip together. The decision to take the trip was mutual, and their unplanned approach to the trip also was mutual. That they enjoyed the extended trip shows that they were close and genuinely enjoyed each other’s company.
The convertible symbolizes the brothers’ reaching out to each other. Before leaving for Vietnam, Henry used the car to reach out to Lyman. He told Lyman to take the car, and he handed over his key. After returning from the war, Henry was emotionally distant, but again he tried to give Lyman full ownership of the car. These are significant episodes in the story because they reveal Henry’s love for Lyman. As a Chippewa, Henry learned to be reserved in expressing his feelings; his culture expected men to refrain from emotional displays. Because of this, he would not tell his brother outright that he loved him, wanted him to be independent, or feared that he (Henry) might not return from the war. Instead, he expressed these feelings by offering the car to his brother.
Lyman used the car as a means to reach out to Henry. When Henry returned from the war moody, detached, and silent, Lyman intentionally damaged the car to get Henry involved in something. When Henry saw the condition of the car, he said to Lyman, “When I left, that car was running like a watch. Now I don’t know if I can get it to start again, let alone get it anywhere near its old condition.” Henry’s statement is deeply significant when read in light of the car’s dual meaning. Lyman’s decision to damage the convertible was important because he saw the car as his brother’s only chance of regaining his sense of self. When Lyman damaged the car, cosmetically and mechanically, he demonstrated his willingness to risk not only a prized possession but also his relationship with his brother (symbolized by the car) for his brother’s happiness. The changing physical condition of the car is also symbolic of the relationship of the brothers because it reflects the status of their brotherly closeness.
Besides symbolizing the complex relationship between Lyman and Henry, the convertible represents other aspects of the characters’ inner worlds. During the summer road trip, it represented freedom. At the time, Lyman was only sixteen, an age at which most young people long to explore the world and to make their own decisions. Together, Lyman and Henry used the car to leave the reservation where they lived and to see what was beyond its borders.
The convertible also symbolizes the carefree, innocent life that precedes Henry’s three years in Vietnam. Lyman and Henry traveled without care or worry, enjoying whatever experiences came their way. When Henry prepared to leave for Vietnam, he gave Lyman his key to the car. Henry likely realized that by going to Vietnam, he was sacrificing his innocence. Lyman, however, could still enjoy being carefree, so, by giving Lyman his key, Henry was encouraging him to embrace his last innocent years. At the end of the story, Henry dies in the river, and Lyman runs the car in after him. This is a highly symbolic moment because it represents the end of Lyman’s innocence as well as the end of the brothers’ relationship. The car had no meaning for him after his brother was gone, and he had learned too much about the world to feel carefree again.
The car represents as well a much-needed outlet for Henry after the war. When he came home, he was unable to function as he had in the past. After Lyman damaged the car, Henry had the opportunity to work toward a goal, instead of watching television all day. In this way, the car symbolizes Henry’s need for a sense of purpose and mastery. He did not know how to be a member of his family or community, but he did know how to fix the car. Fixing the car seems to have lifted his spirits because it was familiar and something that allowed him to feel useful and competent for a while.
“The Red Convertible” is a seemingly simple story, but the changing symbolism of the car gives it richness and depth. In describing metaphors, scholars often use the terms vehicle and tenor. The vehicle is the image used to communicate meaning (the tenor) to the reader. Applying this terminology to the convertible in Erdrich’s story, the reader finds numerous tenors revealed through one literal vehicle. Fraternal bonds, freedom, innocence, control, and wisdom–all of these themes are carried by one red convertible.
Full Text: COPYRIGHT 2002 The Gale Group, COPYRIGHT 2007 Gale
Source Citation
Source Citation
MLA 9th Edition APA 7th Edition Chicago 17th Edition Harvard
Bussey, Jennifer. “Critical Essay on ‘The Red Convertible’.” Short Stories for Students, edited by Jennifer Smith, vol. 14, Gale, 2002. Gale Literature Resource Center

Advocating for a change in the public school system is the theme. The topic I’ve

Advocating for a change in the public school system is the theme. The topic I’ve decided to choose is mandatory trade training. I need to construct an argument concerning one side of the education issue, and advocate for a course of action. Sources need to be from ebscohost or pro quest. Bibliography/ works cited page & proposal.

Write a minimum 1-page paper (250 words) defining something To clarify the abstr

Write a minimum 1-page paper (250 words) defining something
To clarify the abstract
To provide personal interpretation of the vague, controversial, or misunderstood
To explain the new or unusual (slang, dialect, or jargon)
To make understandable the unfamiliar
To offer information to a particular audience
To inform or entertain by presenting a word’s interesting history, uses, or effects
Know your purpose—to explain, inform, or convince.
Give readers a reason to read. Present a new or better interpretation of a term.
Keep the audience in mind. Always anticipate readers and present clear explanations.
Use enough strategies to clarify the definition. Describe, offer examples, compare or contrast, give synonyms, tell what the term does not mean, present the history, discuss causes or effects, etc.
Don’t present an incomplete definition. The subject may be too broad.
Don’t begin every definition quoting Webster. Blend standard definitions into discussion.
Don’t define vaguely or with generalities. Use specific and vivid details to explain.
Don’t offer circular definitions. Don’t just rename the subject (a poet writes poetry).
Statements are generalities or opinions without examples to support them.
You can use a series of brief examples or a few examples in more detail.
One long example is called an extended example.
Examples can explain and clarify, adding detail to help explain abstract or difficult concepts.
Make sure examples are relevant and support the general statements they illustrate.
Choose the strongest and most convincing examples.
Use enough examples to make each point clear and persuasive. Be sure to support and explain all major points adequately.

The Stakeholder Proposal is a research-based, problem-solution proposal directed

The Stakeholder Proposal is a research-based, problem-solution proposal directed to an individual stakeholder. I provided you with everything “the topic, the Stakeholder…etc” that I want you to talk about in the files, please check them out. Thanks a lot!