Essay Topic – Carefully explain the discussion of whether virtue can be taught

Essay Topic
– Carefully explain the discussion of whether virtue can be taught in Plato’s Meno, pp. 889-897. Carefully explain the argument Socrates gives that virtue can be taught and the opposing argument he gives that it can’t be taught. Carefully explain, in addition, Socrates’ view of how it is possible for people to become virtuous if virtue can’t be taught. Do you think virtue is teachable or not, and what reasons would you give for your view? In explaining your view, explain where you agree with Socrates and/or where you disagree with him on what he says about the teachability of virtue.
Before writing your essay, be sure that you read the instructions given below. Failure to adhere strictly to all of the following requirements for writing your essay will result in a substantial grade penalty or even a grade of F.
Minimum Essay Length: From the list of topics below you are to choose one and write an essay on it with a MINIMUM length of 7-8 double-spaced pages. There is no maximum length, but the essay should be relatively concise.
Spelling: It is ESSENTIAL that the essay you submit have few if any spelling errors. Essays with a lot of spelling errors will suffer a substantial grade penalty. I regard it as important that names, and not just words, be spelled correctly: DO NOT, for example, spell the name of Plato as Platos. There is NO EXCUSE for any spelling errors since you can spell-check your essay automatically with a word processor’s spell-checker tool.
Copying Quotations: If you quote some philosophical text, make sure that you copy the quotation correctly! There is NO EXCUSE for miscopied quotations (quotations, for example, containing misspelled words or grammatical mistakes introduced by the student through carelessness). You may shorten a quotation by deleting certain words or strings of words and indicating your deletion by using an ellipsis (…)
Neatness and Grammar: Overall, your essay must be neatly written, with a minimum of grammatical errors. Essays that are sloppily written in terms of grammar will suffer a substantial grade penalty.
Line Spacing: Your essay must be double-spaced. Space between lines CANNOT be greater than 2 points. DO NOT add extra spacing between paragraphs ANYWHERE in your essay.
Paragraph Spacing: Spacing between paragraphs MUST be double-spaced only. In other words, the spacing between the last line of any given paragraph and the first line of the next must be EXACTLY THE SAME as the spacing between lines within a paragraph.
Margins: Top and bottom margins must be no greater than one inch; side margins must be no greater than 1.25 inches.
Font: Your essay must use Times New Roman, and the point size must be no greater than 12.
Cover Sheet and First Page: Your essay MUST have a cover sheet bearing the essay topic and your name. Do not add any graphics or images to your cover sheet. The following page of your essay (page 1) must contain only writing, which must begin at the very top of the page.
Inclusion of Extraneous (Non-Philosophical) Discussion: Your essay MUST contain at least seven to eight full pages of philosophical writing directly relevant to your chosen topic. If you wish to include extraneous or non-philosophical material in your discussion, such as details of a philosopher’s biography, please be advised that such material won’t be counted toward fulfilling the minimum page-length requirement.
Textual Sources Required by Your Essay: The textual sources that must be used in your essay will be indicated by the topic you’ve chosen (assuming you’ve chosen to write your essay on a topic from the list below). You MUST use the versions of those texts put on Canvas; use of any other versions will result in a grade of F for the paper. For example, if you choose to write your essay on Topic # 2, you MUST use the translation of Plato’s Meno in the Course Readings folder on Canvas: you CANNOT use a different version/translation of that text; doing so will result in an F.
Use of Required Sources: The essay must be based on a close and careful reading of ALL texts required by your topic. Moreover, the essay you write must show clear evidence that it is indeed based on a close and careful reading of the relevant texts. Too often students submit essays that appear to have been written entirely (or almost entirely) on the basis of notes taken in class. Such essays do not merit a passing grade, and will be given an F.
Your Essay Must Contain Five Quotations from the Required Sources: The paper topics listed below require the use of between one and two textual sources. You will have to include in your essay at least FIVE quotations from these sources. Further, each quotation MUST contain at least three full sentences. For example, a quotation from the Meno that meets this requirement is the following: “Come then, let us try to tell you what shape is. See whether you will accept that it is this: Let us say that shape is that which alone among existing things always follows color….I should be satisfied if you defined virtue in this way” (Plato, Meno, p. 875 [Stephanus number 75b-c]). If you insert a quotation into your essay with more than three sentences, the quotation should not be too long or contain too many more sentences than three.
If your essay contains exactly five quotations, then each quotation must be from a different page of text than any of the other quotations is from. If your essay contains more than five quotations, then your essay must contain at least five quotations each of which is from a different page of text than any of the others in that group of five is from.
Needless to say, no quotation should be inserted into your essay mindlessly or at random, but rather should be inserted so as to intelligently facilitate your discussion.
Avoiding Plagiarism in the Use of Quotations: Any quotations you insert into your essay must be enclosed in quotation marks and fully referenced, either in parentheses or in a footnote/endnote. (See the item on plagiarism below.) A bibliography at the end of your essay is not necessary, provided all sources you have used are referred to in parentheses within the body of your essay or in footnotes or endnotes. Also, while you don’t have to use sources other than those required by your chosen topic, your essay must show somehow, and very clearly, that you have carefully read the course material you are required to use to write your essay, otherwise, your grade will suffer.
Use of Other (Non-Required) Sources: You may use, if you wish, sources besides those specified in the topic you’ve chosen, for example, a book borrowed from the library, an e-book available through the St. John’s University libraries website, or a reliable internet source on philosophy, such as the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (http://www.iep.utm.edu/) or the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (http://plato.stanford.edu/).
In Your Own Words: While you may (indeed must) use quotations in your essay, the essay must be written entirely by YOU, largely in your own words. NEVER attempt to explain a philosophical idea or argument simply through direct quotation of another author or a very close paraphrase.
Importance of Good Exposition: The essay topics below call upon you to expound or explain ideas, arguments, theories, etc., presented in certain philosophical writings. Thus careful and accurate exposition (or explanation) of such ideas, arguments, or theories is of fundamental importance to writing a good term essay. You may, if you like, critically evaluate the ideas, arguments, theories you’re writing about, or present some of your own thoughts about the topic(s) with which those ideas, arguments, or theories are concerned, but that is not required unless explicitly specified by the essay topic. In short, the essay topics below require you to write a good expository essay, they don’t (unless explicitly specified) require you to engage in critical thinking in the usual sense of that term. It cannot be stressed enough, however, the importance of being able to understand and analyze the content of philosophical or any other type of theoretical writing; without that ability, one cannot engage in any meaningful critical or creative thought—just as in art one is unlikely to be able to do any significant creative work without the training that enables one to do what others have done before.
Plagiarism: Inclusion in your essay of written material you are not yourself the author of, without any indication that you are quoting someone else’s work (such as using quotation marks and providing an appropriate citation of author and work), amounts to plagiarism: plagiarism of any extent will (even just a single sentence), if discovered, will result in an automatic and irrevocable F for the assignment. You will not be given a second chance, and I will not listen to any explanations or pleadings on your part. This is a warning you must heed. You are responsible for having read this warning and taken it seriously. Essays will be checked for plagiarism using the plagiarism-detection program Turnitin.
Choose Your Essay Topic Wisely: Do not pick an essay topic at random. Ideally, you should pick a topic that interests you, and one which you also feel relatively confident that you can write a good essay on from the point of view of being able to understand the philosophic texts required by the topic you’ve chosen. If you choose an essay topic not out of any interest but simply to fulfill the requirement of turning in a paper, it will be especially important to pick a topic carefully, choosing one you feel pretty confident falls within your capacity to write an essay on. If you choose a topic but then come to feel it is too difficult or challenging for you while writing your essay, then it will be advisable for you to abandon the project and choose another, less challenging topic. (This last point highlights the importance of picking a topic and beginning writing well in advance of the essay’s due date.)
Choosing a Topic Not on the List, or Modifying a Topic on the List: If you would like to write an essay on a topic you have come up with yourself, you will have to submit your proposed topic to me at least three weeks before the essay is due in order to obtain my approval. If you submit an essay on a topic not on the list below but do not submit the proposed topic to me for my approval, your essay will receive an automatic F. These same rules also apply if you would like to modify one of the topics on the list and write an essay on that modified topic.
How to Submit Your Essay: You MUST send me an e-copy of your essay (both as an email attachment and pasted into the message body of your e-mail—in case I can’t open your attachment) by the due date. Otherwise, even if you do submit a hard copy by the due date, I will count your essay as not having yet been submitted. You must also submit a hard copy of your essay by the due date. I will not accept essays that are more than seven days late.
Requests for an Extension of Time: If for some reason you cannot (or feel you cannot) submit your essay by the due date, you MUST contact me in advance of the due date to request an extension of time to complete your essay, otherwise you will be automatically penalized for late submission (which will amount to an F if you attempt to submit your essay more than a week after it is due).
Final Word: Choose a topic and begin work on this project as soon as possible. Do NOT wait to the last minute, like two or three days before the due date, otherwise, you won’t be able to write even a halfway decent paper. Only essays that are exceptionally good, both from the standpoint of content and that of language (spelling and grammar), can receive a grade of A or A-.
Essay Topic
– Carefully explain the discussion of whether virtue can be taught in Plato’s Meno, pp. 889-897. Carefully explain the argument Socrates gives that virtue can be taught and the opposing argument he gives that it can’t be taught. Carefully explain, in addition, Socrates’ view of how it is possible for people to become virtuous if virtue can’t be taught. Do you think virtue is teachable or not, and what reasons would you give for your view? In explaining your view, explain where you agree with Socrates and/or where you disagree with him on what he says about the teachability of virtue.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount